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REUTERS, NME

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Ray Manzarek, keyboard player and founder member of the 1960s rock band The Doors died late Monday aged 74, following a battle with cancer.

Manzarek, who lived in Northern California's Napa Valley wine country for the past decade, had been seeking treatment for bile duct cancer at the RoMed Clinic in Rosenheim, Germany, the group's manager Tom Vitorino told Reuters.

Manzarek was of Polish descent, born and raised on the South Side of Chicago. In 1965, front man Jim Morrison and then-UCLA film student Manzarek formed The Doors after a chance meeting at Los Angeles' Venice Beach, NME recalls.

Manzarek’s trademark piercing electric organ sound defined some of the band’s cornerstone hits like Light My Fire, Break On Through to the Other Side or 1971’s mesmerizing Riders on the Storm, helping the psychedelic rock band sell more than 100 million records worldwide.

After The Doors disbanded following the death of Morrison in 1971, Manzarek continued to make music, releasing a number of solo albums and then as part of the group Nite City.

Artists from all over the world have taken to Twitter to pay tribute to the seminal keyboardist.

Sad to here about Ray Manzarek passing. I was lucky to get a chance to rock out with him & the other two Doors.. cheers mate say hi to Jim.

— Billy Idol (@BillyIdol) May 21, 2013

He helped oil the hinges on my squeaky Doors of perception. RIP Ray Manzarek

— Nick Frost (@nickjfrost) May 21, 2013

Thanks for the great music Ray Manzarek!

— Krist Novoselic (@KristNovoselic) May 21, 2013

An interview with Ray Manzarek youtube.com/watch?v=18RcxR… "we exist to make music together" rest in peace, Ray

— Tim Burgess (@Tim_Burgess) May 20, 2013

Aw, I loved Ray Manzarek. He wrote the soundtrack to so many epiphanies. RIP Brother Ray

— Carl Barat (@carlbaratmusic) May 20, 2013

RIP Ray Manzarek words cannot express...

— Slash (@Slash) May 20, 2013

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Society

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

A Mapuche family awaits for Chilean President Gabriel Boric to arrive at the traditional Te Deum in the Cathedral of Santiago, on Chile's Independence Day.

Claudia Andrade

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

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