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UOL (Brazil), AP

SAO PAULO - It was a labor rights story that made world headlines -- and prompted more than a few winks and one-liners. A Brazilian worker for Latin America's biggest brewer was awarded 50,000 reals ($25,000) earlier this month after suing his employer for using prostitutes to motivate sales employees.

Now the plaintiff has told Brazilian News website UOL that there was nothing funny at all about what he went through. Elcio Milczwski, 34, recounted how he was forced by his ex-employer at AmBev — Anheuser Busch subsidiary InBev's Brazilian unit — to rub prostitutes’ bodies with oil and watch porn videos. This was part of motivation sessions promoted by his boss before going to sales.

“I felt like crap,” Milczwski told UOL.

Last Monday, the court released a statement saying Milczwski was once tied up at work and forced to watch pornographic films and a stripper performed in his office, the AP reported. The statement described the plaintiff as a married evangelical Christian.

Milczwski joined AmBev in 2001. His job was visit bars and restaurants to take note of beverage orders.

“The manager started to bring hookers as a way to motivate the crew. But nobody was ever told this was going to happen and, once inside, you couldn’t leave the room," he recalled of the episodes, which took place in 2003 and 2004. "We were all forced to rub the girls’ bodies with oil and we were pushed against them. Those who didn’t agree were bullied. Those who reached goals got a free night with one of the girls.”

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Economy

What's Driving The New Migrant Exodus From Cuba

Since Cuba reopened its borders last December after COVID closures, the number of people leaving the island has gone up significantly. Migration has been a constant in Cuban life since the 1950s. But this article in Cuba's independent news outlet El Toque shows just how important migration is to understand the ordeals of everyday life on the island.

March for the 69th anniversary of the beginning of the Cuban Revolution.

Loraine Morales Pino

HAVANA — Some 157,339 Cubans crossed the border into the United States between Oct. 1, 2021 and June 30, 2022, according to the U.S. Border Patrol — a figure significantly higher than the one recorded during the 1980 Mariel exodus, when a record 125,000 Cubans arrived in the U.S. over a period of seven months.

Migrating has once again become the only way out of the ordeal that life on the island represents.

Cubans of all ages who make the journey set off towards a promise. They prefer the unknown to the grim certainty that the Cuban regime offers them.

Migration from Cuba has been a constant since the 1950s.

In 1956, the largest number of departures was recorded in the colonial and republican periods, with the arrival of 14,953 Cubans in the United States, the historical destination of migratory flows. Since the January 1959 revolution, that indicator has been exceeded 30 times.

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