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Front Pages For A Queen: 37 World Newspapers Mark The Death Of Elizabeth II

"The world weeps", "Farewell, my Queen", "The rock Britain was built on".... were among the headlines as front pages from virtually every newspaper in the world were dedicated to the passing of the iconic monarch. Here is a selection of 37 newspaper front pages from 29 countries.

Front Pages For A Queen: 37 World Newspapers Mark The Death Of Elizabeth II

Newspapers pays tribute to the Queen on their front pages this morning.

The world has been living a bonafide global moment since the news arrived Thursday afternoon that Elizabeth II, Britain's longest-reigning monarch, had died at the age if 96, surrounded by her family in her Scottish home of Balmoral Castle.

It was the poignant bookend on another shared media moment 70 years ago, when her 1952 coronation became one of the major televised events of the 20th century, as BBC cameramen were allowed inside Westminster Abbey, inaugurating a long and complicated history between the British royal family and the media.


World leaders reacted to the news, starting with new UK Prime Minister Liz Truss saluting "the rock on which modern Britain was built" as she announced a 10-day period of national mourning. U.S President Joe Biden paid homage to "a stateswoman of unmatched dignity and constancy" while France’s Emmanuel Macron remembered "a kind-hearted queen who has left a lasting impression on her country and her century."

With newspapers from around the world dedicating their front pages to the news, we've gathered a sample of 37 from 29 different countries:

United Kingdom

The Guardian

France

Libération

Spain

La Razon

Norway

Aftenposten

Belgium

De Morgen

Germany

Morgen Post

Netherlands

de Volkskrant

Croatia

24 Sata

Canada

Toronto Star

Colombia

La Vanguardia

Australia

The Sunday Mail

Nigeria

Daily Trust

Malaysia

The Star

Bahrain

Gulf Today

Saudi Arabia

Arab News

South Africa

The Citizen

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Society

Papá, Papá, On Repeat: Are We Men Ready For Fatherhood To Change Our Lives?

There is a moment on Saturday or Sunday, after having spent ten hours with my kids, that I get a little exasperated, I lose my patience. I find it hard to identify the emotion, I definitely feel some guilt too. I know that time alone with them improves our relationship... but I get bored! Yes, I feel bored. I want some time in the car for them to talk to each other while I can talk about the stupid things we adults talk about.

A baby builds stack of blocks

Ignacio Pereyra*

This is what a friend tells me. He tends to spend several weekends alone with his two children and prefers to make plans with other people instead of being alone with them. As I listened to him, I immediately remembered my long days with Lorenzo, my son, now three-and-a-half years old. I thought especially of the first two-and-a-half years of his life, when he hardly went to daycare (thanks, COVID!) and we’d spend the whole day together.

It also reminded me of a question I often ask myself in moments of boredom — which I had virtually ignored in my life before becoming a father: how willing are we men to let fatherhood change our lives?

It is clear that the routines and habits of a couple change completely when they have children, although we also know that this rarely happens equally.

With the arrival of a child, men continue to work as much or more than before, while women face a different reality: either they double their working day — maintaining a paid job but adding household and care tasks — or they are forced to abandon all or part of their paid work to devote themselves to caregiving.

In other words, "the arrival of a child tends to strengthen the role of economic provider in men (...), while women reinforce their role as caregivers," says an extensive Equimundo report on Latin America and the Caribbean, highlighting a trend that repeats itself in most Western countries.

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