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Norwegian daily Verdens Gang's front page
Norwegian daily Verdens Gang's front page
Worldcrunch

Prince, the American music icon and virtuoso instrumentalist behind "Kiss" and "Purple Rain" died Thursday at his home in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen. He was 57.

After the immediate outpouring of online tributes from fans and celebrities alike, the world's newspapers Friday bid farewell to Prince Rogers Nelson — a.k.a. The Kid, The Artist Formerly Known as Prince, Love Symbol, etc.— starting with the Star Tribune, from his native Minneapolis.

UNITED STATES

Star Tribune

[rebelmouse-image 27090151 alt="""" original_size="750x1478" expand=1]

USA TODAY

[rebelmouse-image 27090152 alt="""" original_size="750x1370" expand=1]

The New York Times

[rebelmouse-image 27090153 alt="""" original_size="750x1317" expand=1]

The Washington Post

New York Daily News


UNITED KINGDOM

[rebelmouse-image 27090154 alt="""" original_size="615x788" expand=1]

Daily Mirror

[rebelmouse-image 27090155 alt="""" original_size="615x772" expand=1]

The Sun

[rebelmouse-image 27090156 alt="""" original_size="615x819" expand=1]

The Independent


FRANCE

[rebelmouse-image 27090157 alt="""" original_size="750x932" expand=1]

Libération

[rebelmouse-image 27090158 alt="""" original_size="750x1039" expand=1]

"Death of a prince" — Le Parisien


ITALY

[rebelmouse-image 27090159 alt="""" original_size="750x1080" expand=1]

"The rebel elf who reinvented pop" — Corriere della Sera


SPAIN

"Farewell to the artist that was Prince" — La Vanguardia


NORWAY

[rebelmouse-image 27090160 alt="""" original_size="750x1067" expand=1]

"The little giant" — Verdens Gang

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Coronavirus

Will China's Zero COVID Ever End?

Too much has been put in to the state-sponsored truth that minimal spread of the virus is the at-all-cost objective. But if the Chinese economy continues to suffer, Xi Jinping may have no choice but to second guess himself.

COVID testing in Guiyang, China

Cfoto/DDP via ZUMA
Deng Yuwen

The tragic bus accident in Guiyang last month — in which 27 people being sent to quarantine were killed — was one of the worst examples of collateral damage since the COVID-19 pandemic began in China nearly three years ago. While the crash can ultimately be traced back to bad government policy, the local authorities did not register it as a Zero COVID related casualty. It was, for them, a simple traffic accident.

The officials in the southern Chinese province of Guizhou, of course, had no alternative. Drawing a link between the deadly crash and the strict policy of Zero COVID, touted by President Xi Jinping, would have revealed the absurdity of the government's choices.

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