When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Society

Prophet Mohammed On Cover of French Satirical Magazine's Special 'Sharia Weekly'

To coincide with the rise of Islamists in Tunisia and Libya, Hebdo Charlie, a popular satirical weekly that's pushed the envelope in the past, has invited a guest editor-in-chief for a special edition: The Prophet. And yes, they say, he believes

An earlier issue of Charlie Hebdo (spidey-man)
An earlier issue of Charlie Hebdo (spidey-man)

*NEWSBITES

PARIS - The French satirical weekly "Charlie Hebdo" is publishing a special edition this week to "celebrate the victory" of the Tunisian Islamist party Ennahda.

The special edition, on newsstands Tuesday, is called "Charia Hebdo" (Sharia Weekly) as a nod to both Ennahda's victory in Tunisia and promises made by new Libyan leaders that the country's new laws would be based on Islamic law Sharia.

The gag included the offering of the guest "editor-in-chief" slot for the special issue to the Prophet, who immediately accepted under one condition splashed on the front page: "100 lashes if you're not dying of laughter."

The special edition features an editorial by the Prophet on "Hallal drinks," two pages of drawings to illustrate the concept of "soft Sharia" and even a supplement for women: "Sharia Madame." The last page features "the covers that you were spared," which includes a drawing of the Prophet with a red clown nose and this comment: "Yes, Islam is compatible with humor."

The cover created a buzz as soon as it hit social networks. Not everyone was pleased with the idea. Some voiced their discontent on Twitter. "We wonder what we're supposed to do not to shock people," said Charlie Hebdo" managing editor and cartoonist, Charb, who goes by one name. "We don't feel like we were being provocative. We just see it as doing our job as usual. The only difference this week is that the Prophet is on the cover and that's rare for him to be on the cover."

In February 2006, Charlie Hebdo was taken to court following the publication of the Prophet's caricatures. French Islamic organizations called them offensive, but the charges were dropped.

"It's a shame that newsrooms only go to extremes on covers referring to Islam or the Prophet," said Charb. According to him the paper was merely "commenting on news," without "representing the Prophet as an extremist."

Read more in Nouvel Observateur in French

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ