International Museum of the Baroque
International Museum of the Baroque
Paula Baldo

PUEBLA — Mexico's recently opened International Museum of the Baroque, in this historic colonial city, is as much a work of art as the numerous 17th- and 18th-century pieces it contains.

Designed for Puebla by Japanese architect Toyo Ito, the structure — with its 53 white walls, all a little different from each other, and many appearing to fold as they support the edifice — doesn't just house Baroque artwork; it seeks to "be" Baroque.

The rooms are open-ended, creating a continuous space that prompts visitors to flow from one display room to another. The natural light that bathes the premises echoes the Baroque period's use of light on statues or spaces to evoke Divine presence.

The building has two floors and does not exceed 20 meters in height. The ground floor contains the collection on display. The first floor is kept for workshops, activities and administration.

A yawning entry hall with its curved staircase provides a display space for benches designed by the Kazuko Fujie workshop and made in part by Puebla textile craftspeople. From there visitors are led to a large interior courtyard, with a shallow pool of swirling, shimmering water that represents, like the museum, the restlessness and exuberance of Baroque's tumultuous age.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Coronavirus

Why U.S. Vaccine Diplomacy In Latin America Makes "Good" Sense

Echoing its cultural diplomacy of the early 20th century, the United States is gifting vaccines to Latin America as part of a renewed "good neighbor'' policy.

Waiting to get the vaccine in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico

Andrea Matallana

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Just before and during World War II, the United States' Good Neighbor policy proved a very effective strategy to improve ties with Latin America. Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the policy's main goal was non-interference and non-intervention. The U.S. would instead focus on reciprocal exchanges with their southern neighbors, including through art and cultural diplomacy.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ