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Popular Zimbabwe Singer Dies At 37

THE HERALD, NEW ZIMBABWE (Zimbabwe)

Worldcrunch

CHITUNGWIZA - Chiwoniso Maraire, one of Zimbabwe's most famous singers, died late Wednesday at the age of 37.

Born in Olympia, U.S., in 1976, Chiwoniso shot to fame in the 1990s thanks to her distinctive voice and her playing the mbira -- also known as sanza, kalimba or "thumb piano" -- a traditional African instrument usually reserved for men.

The World Music star is believed to have succumbed to a lung infection at the South Medical Centre in Chitungwiza where she was treated for chest pain, New Zimbabwe reports.

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Maraire live in 2009 - Photo: CHR!S

An accomplished singer-songwriter, Chiwoniso was honored with the Decouverte Afrique award by Radio France International after releasing her debut album Ancient Voices in 1998.

The album entered the World Music Charts Europe and earned Chiwoniso a nomination in the category Best Female Vocals of Africa for the KORA Award in 1999, The Herald recalls.


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Migrant Lives

What's Driving More Venezuelans To Migrate To The U.S.

With dimmed hopes of a transition from the economic crisis and repressive regime of Nicolas Maduro, many Venezuelans increasingly see the United States, rather than Latin America, as the place to rebuild a life..

Photo of a family of Migrants from Venezuela crossing the Rio Grande between Mexico and the U.S. to surrender to the border patrol with the intention of requesting humanitarian asylum​

Migrants from Venezuela crossed the Rio Grande between Mexico and the U.S. to surrender to the border patrol with the intention of requesting humanitarian asylum.

Julio Borges

-Analysis-

Migration has too many elements to count. Beyond the matter of leaving your homeland, the process creates a gaping emptiness inside the migrant — and outside, in their lives. If forced upon someone, it can cause psychological and anthropological harm, as it involves the destruction of roots. That's in fact the case of millions of Venezuelans who have left their country without plans for the future or pleasurable intentions.

Their experience is comparable to paddling desperately in shark-infested waters. As many Mexicans will concur, it is one thing to take a plane, and another to pay a coyote to smuggle you to some place 'safe.'

Venezuela's mass emigration of recent years has evolved in time. Initially, it was the middle and upper classes and especially their youth, migrating to escape the socialist regime's socio-political and economic policies. Evidently, they sought countries with better work, study and business opportunities like the United States, Panama or Spain. The process intensified after 2017 when the regime's erosion of democratic structures and unrelenting economic vandalism were harming all Venezuelans.

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