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PISA Rankings: Tour The Top 25 Education Nations

PISA Rankings: Tour The Top 25 Education Nations

PARIS - The results are in, and half a million 15-year-olds from 65 countries have spoken.

This collective voice is the results of high-school students from around the world who were measured in a series of math, science and reading tests for the much-anticipated PISA rankings that were announced Tuesday.

PISA, which stands for Program for International Student Assessment, has become a global indicator of education levels (and discrepencies), tallied every three years by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

The test is designed to assess how students use what they've learned inside and outside of school to solve problems. Asian teenagers dominated in all areas in the latest ranking, which was administered in 2012, taking the top seven spots and knocking Finland down from its 3rd position in 2009.

The average score of all 65 countries was 494 out of 1000, coincidentally the same score as the UK (26th place), with Peru bringing up the rear with just 368. The United States is ranked 36th, a major drop from 17th place in the last rankings.

Here’s a look at the Top 25 countries on our Mondo map with excerpts of the PISA report. Read the full report here.


Photo by sazzydg via Instagram

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Drones, Tablets, Cigarettes: How Ukraine's Reconnaissance Warriors Pinpoint The Enemy

Near the embattled city of Vuhledar, Ukrainian artillery reconnaissance units detect enemy positions. They work with drones, tablets and satellite internet — and they are often the last line of defense from a Russian onslaught.

Image of a soldier from the 56th Mariupol Motorized Brigade looking straight into  his DJI Matrice 300 RTK quad copter.

A soldier from the 56th Mariupol Motorized Brigade showing a DJI Matrice 300 RTK quad copter.

Anatolii Schara

VUHLEDAR — It's early in the morning, just before dawn. The artillery reconnaissance units are in Kurakhove, a city in Donetsk oblast, to pick up the equipment supplies that have just arrived from Kyiv: drones, tablets, portable solar power generators and Internet hardware for connection to the Starlink satellite system.

Because of the tremendous strain on the equipment, it needs to be constantly replaced. Everything is loaded into all-terrain vehicles, then they head toward the fiercely contested city of Vuhledar, in southeastern Ukraine, 60 kilometers from Donetsk.

"The task of artillery reconnaissance is to locate and fix enemy targets and to conduct artillery observation," explains commander Zeus, who only gives his combat name, in line with the policy of the Ukrainian army.

Artillery fire is mainly indirect. The target is not visible from the gun, which is usually located four to ten kilometers from the front line.

On the car radio, the music ends, the presenter announces in a solemn voice that Ukrainian troops are retreating in panic from Vuhledar. The men are unimpressed; they know that only Russian stations work in the frontline area.

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