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PISA Rankings: Tour The Top 25 Education Nations

PARIS - The results are in, and half a million 15-year-olds from 65 countries have spoken.

This collective voice is the results of high-school students from around the world who were measured in a series of math, science and reading tests for the much-anticipated PISA rankings that were announced Tuesday.

PISA, which stands for Program for International Student Assessment, has become a global indicator of education levels (and discrepencies), tallied every three years by the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

The test is designed to assess how students use what they've learned inside and outside of school to solve problems. Asian teenagers dominated in all areas in the latest ranking, which was administered in 2012, taking the top seven spots and knocking Finland down from its 3rd position in 2009.

The average score of all 65 countries was 494 out of 1000, coincidentally the same score as the UK (26th place), with Peru bringing up the rear with just 368. The United States is ranked 36th, a major drop from 17th place in the last rankings.

Here’s a look at the Top 25 countries on our Mondo map with excerpts of the PISA report. Read the full report here.


Photo by sazzydg via Instagram

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Society

Can Men Help Breastfeed Their Children?

In a tribe in central Africa, male and female roles are practically interchangeable in caregiving to children. Even though their lifestyle might sound strange to the West, it offers important life lessons about who raises children — and how.

Photo of a marble statue of a man, focused on the torso

No milk — but comfort and warmth for the baby

Ignacio Pereyra

The southwestern regions of the Central African Republic and the northern Republic of Congo are home to the Aka, a nomadic tribe of hunter-gatherers who, from a Western point-of-view, are surprising because male and female roles are practically interchangeable.

Though women remain the primary caregivers, what is interesting is that their society has a level of flexibility virtually unknown to ours.

While the women hunt, the men care for the children; while the men cook, the women decide where to settle, and vice versa. This was observed by anthropologist Barry Hewlett, a professor at Washington State University, who lived for long periods alongside the tribe. “It is the most egalitarian human society possible,” Hewlett said in an interview.

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