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Ooh La La - French Art Museum Censored By Facebook For Nude Photograph

LE NOUVEL OBSERVATEUR (France), FACEBOOK

Worldcrunch

PARIS - On Friday, the Jeu de Paume museum's Facebook account was blocked for 24 hours, following a decision by Facebook to remove a photograph the Parisian museum posted on its page and which the social network ruled was a violation of its Rights and Responsibilities guidelines.

We have removed content you posted. We have removed the following content you posted or were the admin of because it violates Facebook's Statement of Rights and Responsibilities.

The picture of a naked woman by Laure Albin Guillot (1879-1962) was part of a exhibition on the French photographer at the Jeu de Paume contemporary art museum in central Paris, Le Nouvel Observateur reports.

Here is the message the Jeu de Paume museum posted on its Facebook page after the 24-hour ban:

"We’ve missed you!

We had already committed other offenses in the past, publishing nudes by Willy Ronis and Manuel Alvarez Bravo. If we receive another warning from Facebook, our account may be permanently deactivated.

We will not publish nudes in the future, even though we believe that they have a high artistic value, and that there is nothing pornographic about these photographs, which are in accordance with "the right to publish contents of a personal nature."

Last year, Facebook removed an image of Gerhard Richter’s “Ema” from Paris’ Pompidou Center’s page, although it later apologized for confusing the painting with a photo – nude photos are forbidden on the social network, but not nude paintings or sculptures.

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