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Germany

Nowitzki's 'Wurst' Ad Has German Vegetarians All Riled Up

Dirk Nowitzki has earned himself some Facebook flack over a television commercial he did in his native Germany. Vegetarians are up in arms over the ad, in which the NBA all star makes an open plug for a national delicacy… sausage!

Dirk Nowitzki slam dunking a piece of sausage
Dirk Nowitzki slam dunking a piece of sausage


*NEWSBITES

Dirk Nowitzki has a new ad out for a German bank that has unleashed a furor on Facebook. The NBA champion's alleged faux pas: eating a healthy slice of sausage.

The ad for the Ing-DiBa bank shows the basketball star visiting a butcher shop while on a trip back to his native Germany. In the shop an elderly lady behind the counter gives Nowitzki a slice of wurst to sample. A propos of wurst-eating she asks him: "What did we always used to say?" she asks the 2.13 meter (7-foot) basketball whiz just as he is about to munch his sausage. "So you grow big and strong," Nowitzki replies.

First impressions of the ad are that it is folksy and nostalgic. But take a second look and that's when it hits. What is the butcher shop lady giving the player recently voted German Athlete of the Year? Wurst! Dead and ground-up animal! It was enough to unleash a barrage of complaints by vegetarians on the bank's Facebook page. The bank responded by appealing to followers to deal with the issue with the "greatest possible respect."

If only Nowitzki had stayed with his old ad, which showed him throwing coffee beans into glasses. Although – if you think about that… Don't coffee beans have feelings too?

Read the full article in German by Lars Wallrodt

Photo - Youtube

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

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Society

Mahsa Amini, Martyr Of An Iranian Regime Designed To Abuse Women

The 22-year-old is believed to have been beaten to death at a Tehran police station last week after "morality police" had reprimanded her clothing. The case has sparked the nation's outrage. But as ordinary Iranians testify, such beatings, torture and a home brand of misogyny are hallmarks of the 40-year Islamic Republic of Iran.

Mahsa Amini

Firouzeh Nordstrom

-Analysis-

TEHRAN — The death in Iran of a 22-year-old Mahsa Amini — after she was arrested by the so-called "morality police" — has unleashed another wave of protests, as thousands of Iranians vent their fury against an intrusive and violent regime. Indeed, as tragically exceptional as the circumstances appear, the reaction reflects the daily reality of abuse by authorities, especially directed toward women.

Amini, a Kurdish-Iranian girl visiting Tehran with relatives, was detained by the regime's morality patrols on Sept. 13, apparently for not respecting the Islamic dress code that includes proper use of the hijab headscarf. Amini was declared dead two or three days after being taken into custody. Officials say she fainted and died, and blamed a preexisting heart condition. But neither her family nor anyone else in Iran believe that, as can be seen in the mounting protests that have now left at least three dead.

For Amini's was hardly the first arbitrary arrest, or the first suspected death in custody under Iran's Islamic regime.

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