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NFL And Referees Reach Deal, End Lockout

NFL.COM, AP, REUTERS (USA)

Worldcrunch

After two days of marathon negotiations, the National Football League (NFL) has reached an agreement to end a labor dispute with its regular game referees, ending three weeks of questionable calls that had threatened the integrity of the sport, Reuters reports.

Welcome back regular refs; it's been too long: yhoo.it/PqxvF7 @mikesilver

— Yahoo! Sports NFL (@YahooSports_NFL) September 27, 2012

The agreement hinged on working out pension and retirement benefits for the officials, who are part-time employees of the league.

Replacement referees worked the first three weeks of the 2012 season, triggering a wave of outrage that threatened to disrupt the rest of the season.

Now that the NFL Official's strike is over, the replacement refs can back to their regular jobs in Congress.

— Don Nichols (@TheDairylandDon) September 27, 2012

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell told NFL.com that the refs will be back on the field starting Thursday night, for the game between the Cleveland Browns and Baltimore Ravens.

After a missed call cost the Green Bay Packers a win on a chaotic final play at Seattle on Monday night, it became clear that a tentative agreement had to be reached to end the lockout that began in June, AP reports.

Thank you, Packers, for being the lambs sacrified to get both sides serious about getting the deal done and then reaching the agreement.

— John McClain (@McClain_on_NFL) September 27, 2012

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Geopolitics

How Ukraine Keeps Getting The West To Flip On Arms Supplies

The open debate on weapon deliveries to Ukraine is highly unusual, but Kyiv has figured out how to use the public moral suasion — and patience — to repeatedly shift the question in its favor. But will it work now for fighter jets?

Photo of a sunset over the USS Nimitz with a man guiding fighter jets ready for takeoff

U.S fighter jets ready for takeoff on the USS Nimitz

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — In what other war have arms deliveries been negotiated so openly in the public sphere?

On Monday, a journalist asked Joe Biden if he plans on supplying F-16 fighter jets to Ukraine. He answered “No”. A few hours later, the same question was asked to Emmanuel Macron, about French fighter jets. Macron did not rule it out.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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Visiting Paris on Tuesday, Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksïï Reznikov recalled that a year ago, the United States had refused him ground-air Stinger missiles deliveries. Eleven months later, Washington is delivering heavy tanks, in addition to everything else. The 'no' of yesterday is the green light of tomorrow: this is the lesson that the very pragmatic minister seemed to learn.

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