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New Zealand Post Thinking About Cutting Mail Delivery To Three Days A Week

TVNZ, NEW ZEALAND HERALD (New Zealand)

Worldcrunch

WELLINGTON - In order to adapt to the decreasing volume of posted items, the New Zealand Post is considering cutting mail delivery from six to three days a week to allow "greater flexibility" in its services, according to the New Zealand Herald.

Although Communications and Information Technology Minister Amy Adams said that no measures would be taken unless they had public approval, Prime Minister John key insisted on the inevitability of the process: “People are receiving less mail so it makes sense for New Zealand Post to get itself sorted out,” reports TVNZ.

According to the New Zealand Herald, mail volumes have dropped considerably during the last 10 years, with 265 million fewer items being posted each year compared to 2002. This number is expected to drop by a further 25% in the next five years.

The debate has spread across the country, between those who rely on the Internet technology and those who still count on postal services. "About 30% of NZ isn't online and that's a significant number, and older people do value the mail more," Graeme Clarke of the postal Workers Union told TVNZ.

George Collins, a postal industry organizer for NZ’s largest union, the EPMU, said he didn’t believe the cuts would be justified. "Are New Zealanders going to wait days for their mail?" he asked.

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Running out of ideas to keep the mail coming

Photo wikipedia

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Why Russia Is Suddenly Deploying Air Defense Systems On Moscow Rooftops

Russia is increasingly concerned about security from the sky: air defense systems have been installed on rooftops in Moscow's government quarter. Systems have also appeared in several other places in Russia, including near Vladimir Putin's lakeside home in Valdai. What is the Kremlin really worried about?

photo of ice on the river in Moscow

Clear skies, cold reality along the Moskva River

Anna Akage

-Analysis-

The Russian Defense Ministry has refused to comment. State Duma parliamentary officials say it’s a fake. Still, a series of verified photographs have circulated in recent days of an array of long-range C-400 and short-range air defense systems installed on three complexes in Moscow near the Kremlin, as well as on locations in the outskirts of the capital and in the northwest village of Valdai, where Vladimir Putin has a lakeside residence.

Some experts believe the air defense installations in Moscow were an immediate response to recent Ukrainian statements about a new fleet of military drones: The Ukroboronprom defense contracter said this month that it completed a series of successful tests of a new strike drone with a range of over 1,000 kilometers. Analyst Michael Naki suggests that Moscow’s anti-air defense systems were an immediate reaction to the fact that the drones can theoretically hit Kremlin.

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Yet the air defense installations in Valdai seem to have been in place since late December, following Ukrainian drone attacks on a military airfield deep inside Russia’s Sorotov region, 730 kilometers (454 miles) southeast of Moscow.

Others pose a very different rationale to explain Russia’s beefing up anti-air defenses on its own territory. Russian military analyst Yan Matveev argues that Putin demanded the deployment of such local systems not as defense against long-range Ukrainian drones, but rather for fear of sabotage from inside Russia.

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