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TVNZ, NEW ZEALAND HERALD (New Zealand)

Worldcrunch

WELLINGTON - In order to adapt to the decreasing volume of posted items, the New Zealand Post is considering cutting mail delivery from six to three days a week to allow "greater flexibility" in its services, according to the New Zealand Herald.

Although Communications and Information Technology Minister Amy Adams said that no measures would be taken unless they had public approval, Prime Minister John key insisted on the inevitability of the process: “People are receiving less mail so it makes sense for New Zealand Post to get itself sorted out,” reports TVNZ.

According to the New Zealand Herald, mail volumes have dropped considerably during the last 10 years, with 265 million fewer items being posted each year compared to 2002. This number is expected to drop by a further 25% in the next five years.

The debate has spread across the country, between those who rely on the Internet technology and those who still count on postal services. "About 30% of NZ isn't online and that's a significant number, and older people do value the mail more," Graeme Clarke of the postal Workers Union told TVNZ.

George Collins, a postal industry organizer for NZ’s largest union, the EPMU, said he didn’t believe the cuts would be justified. "Are New Zealanders going to wait days for their mail?" he asked.

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Running out of ideas to keep the mail coming

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How South American Oceans Can Sway The U.S.-China Showdown

As global rivalries and over-fishing impact the seas around South America, countries there must find a common strategy to protect their maritime backyards.

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Yet there is very little debate in South America on the Sino-American confrontation and its impact on seas around South America, specifically the South-Eastern Pacific (SEP) and South-Western Atlantic (SWA). These have long ceased to be empty spaces — and their importance to the world's superpowers can only grow.

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