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Ali in 1966
Ali in 1966

PARIS — The death of Muhammed Ali is that rare global moment when the world is not only talking about the same topic, but largely saying the same thing.

The 74-year-old boxing legend transcended differences without ever flinching from life's toughest questions. He was the Greatest, and also good; a fighter hailed for his intelligence who displayed his greatest courage outside the ring. Speaking to the the BBC, Ali's younger brother Rahman Ali recalled the champion's kindness and goodness, but also put a measure on his fame: "There was nobody on this Earth more famous than Muhammad Ali, he was known in every country."

Here is a look at 31 Sunday newspapers from 23 different nations to offer a taste of that singular planetary status, from Australia to Saudi Arabia and Sweden, from Paris and Caracas to Ali's hometown of Louisville, Kentucky:

Australia

[rebelmouse-image 27090224 alt="""" original_size="750x1109" expand=1]

Japan

[rebelmouse-image 27090225 alt="""" original_size="750x959" expand=1]

(Asahi Shimbun)

India

(Aajkaal)

United Arab Emirates

[rebelmouse-image 27090226 alt="""" original_size="750x1075" expand=1]

Iran

The daily Shargh has a small recent photo of Ali in tuxedo on the upper left. One of the human rights causes in his final year was the Muslim boxing legend calling on Tehran to release imprisoned Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian.

[rebelmouse-image 27090227 alt="""" original_size="750x1014" expand=1]

Saudi Arabia

(Asharq al Awsat)

Egypt

Al Ahram features a photo of Ali in the 1960s with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser

[rebelmouse-image 27090228 alt="""" original_size="750x1100" expand=1]

South Africa

The Johannesburg-based Sunday Times was sure to include a famous photo of a mustachioed Ali with Nelson Mandela

[rebelmouse-image 27090229 alt="""" original_size="750x1080" expand=1]

Spain

[rebelmouse-image 27090230 alt="""" original_size="750x893" expand=1]

[rebelmouse-image 27090231 alt="""" original_size="750x941" expand=1]

Germany

[rebelmouse-image 27090232 alt="""" original_size="750x1063" expand=1]

Denmark

[rebelmouse-image 27090233 alt="""" original_size="750x1104" expand=1]

France

[rebelmouse-image 27090234 alt="""" original_size="750x1119" expand=1]

[rebelmouse-image 27090235 alt="""" original_size="750x961" expand=1]

Italy

[rebelmouse-image 27090236 alt="""" original_size="750x1082" expand=1]

Italy's largest sports daily featured the iconic photo of knocked-out Sonny Liston, and Ali's most famous poem translated in Italian as "Danza" (dance) like a butterfly..

[rebelmouse-image 27090237 alt="""" original_size="750x1064" expand=1]

UK

[rebelmouse-image 27090238 alt="""" original_size="750x1141" expand=1]

[rebelmouse-image 27090239 alt="""" original_size="750x927" expand=1]

Sweden

[rebelmouse-image 27090240 alt="""" original_size="750x1054" expand=1]

Turkey

[rebelmouse-image 27090241 alt="""" original_size="750x1247" expand=1]

Canada

[rebelmouse-image 27090242 alt="""" original_size="750x918" expand=1]

U.S.

Here's the front page from the top daily in Ali's hometown of Louisville, Kentucky

[rebelmouse-image 27090243 alt="""" original_size="750x1316" expand=1]

[rebelmouse-image 27090244 alt="""" original_size="750x1596" expand=1]

[rebelmouse-image 27090245 alt="""" original_size="750x595" expand=1]

Argentina

[rebelmouse-image 27090246 alt="""" original_size="750x1159" expand=1]

Brazil

[rebelmouse-image 27090247 alt="""" original_size="750x1391" expand=1]

Ecuador

[rebelmouse-image 27090248 alt="""" original_size="750x1341" expand=1]

Mexico

The Mexico City daily La Jornada featured a photo of Ali with Fidel Castro

[rebelmouse-image 27090249 alt="""" original_size="750x1050" expand=1]

Venezuela

[rebelmouse-image 27090250 alt="""" original_size="750x933" expand=1]

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