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Jeremy Lin Is A Junior High Exam Topic

LIBERTY TIMES (Taiwan)

TAICHUNG - Is Jeremy Lin Taiwanese or American? This dumb question, as some put it, appeared on a recent test at a Taiwanese junior high school.

Half of the students answered "Taiwanese." Wrong! But the apparently light exam topic about an NBA basketball player has set off hot debate in Taiwan, where geopolitics, nationality and identity are often a source of confusion and consternation, reports the Liberty Times daily.

Some parents of students who were marked wrong brought this "injustice" to local city council arbitration. Both the mayor and the director of Taichung's education department say they believe both answers should be credited, in a politically correct manner.

Jason Hu the Mayor said "Legally speaking he's an American, whereas considering him as a Taiwanese is an emotional issue".

Earlier this year, with the arrival of the global phenomenon known as Linsanity, the national origin of the New York Knicks guard set off a sort of standoff among America, Taiwan and China. A visiting U.S. Congressman even corrected Taiwanese President Ma Ying-Jeou, who had referred to Lin as a "Taiwanese." Mainland China also likes to claim him as one of their own.

So in a country where even the president considers himself to be "a Taiwanese as well a Chinese," and the notions of nationality and diaspora can be so raw, putting a sports star on a junior high exam is not such a light question after all.

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Geopolitics

Limits Of Convenience: Why Russia-China Cooperation Won't Last

Moscow and Beijing may seem like strategic partners, but it's revealing itself clearly as a marriage of convenience. And ultimately they are naturally competitors, wary if the other grows stronger.

Limits Of Convenience: Why Russia-China Cooperation Won't Last

February 2022. Vladimir Putin attending the remony of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.

Alexei Druzhinin/Kremlin Pool / Planet Pix via ZUMA Press Wire
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-Analysis-

Long before Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese Premier Xi Jinping were growing closer. China’s goal? To revamp the current world order, significantly weaken the West and its leaders, and to become the world-dominating figurehead over and above the United States.

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Russia’s war in Ukraine has become an essential element of this plan to destabilize the global situation.

When the West began imposing stringent sanctions on Russia, China instead chose to economically support Putin and left its markets open to accept raw materials from Russia. But don’t think this means China is Putin’s lapdog. Quite the contrary: Beijing has never helped Moscow to its own detriment, not wishing to fall under the punitive measures of the US and Europe.

At the same time, the Russian-Chinese alliance stirred dissatisfaction amongst the elite in both Beijing and Moscow. China was not expecting Russia’s plans to occupy Ukraine in a matter of days to fail and as a result, China’s aim to destabilize the West alongside its Russian partner failed.

Add to this the various alliances in the West emerging against Beijing and fears for China’s economy on home turf is beginning to grow.

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