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Italy

Italy Hit By Second Wave Of Economic-Related Suicides

LA REPUBBLICA (Italy)

ROME – After a lull, Italy has registered a new spate of economic-related suicides following a wave of such deaths last month.

Three Italian men killed themselves Tuesday because they could no longer bear their economic situation, La Repubblica reports. In the southern city of Salerno, Generoso Armenante, a 49-year-old who lost his job two years ago, hanged himself after he was told to give back the flat that came with the job. He is survived by his wife, who is unemployed, and their two children. Nearby, and on the same day, Angelo Coppola, 64, the owner of a small construction company, killed himself at his home leaving a note blaming his despondency on his economic situtation.

Meanwhile in Milan, another business owner, Luigi Fenzi, 60, hanged himself from a tree. A note in the pocket of his shirt read: "Without work there is no dignity and I don't have work anymore. I can't pay my debts nor can I feed my family. It must end, I'm ashamed."

The dramatic single-day tally follows a national outcry last month when a weeks-long string of suicides attributed to Italy's crisis, as the economic sunk back into recession. Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti responded Wednesday to "the human consequences' of the crisis, but later denied that he was referring specifically to the suicides. Italian trade unions have renewed their calls for a response from policymakers, noting in particular the situation of the "esodati," or unemployed workers over 50 who are too young to receive any pension and too old to be retrained.

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Green

As Air Quality Worsens, Kampala Citizens Find It Difficult to Breathe

Kampala’s air quality is much worse than globally accepted standards, but several interventions are being instituted to avert its effects.

As Air Quality Worsens, Kampala Citizens Find It Difficult to Breathe

Rush hour traffic in Kampala, Uganda on Sept. 9, 2022. Kampala’s air is nine times more polluted than the World Health Organization’s recommended limit.

Apophia Agiresaasi

KAMPALA, UGANDA — There’s something in Kampala’s air. Philomena Nabweru Rwabukuku’s body could tell even before she went to see a doctor. The retired teacher and her children used to get frequent asthma attacks, especially after they had been up and about in the city where there were many vehicles. It was worse when they lived in Naluvule, a densely populated Kampala suburb where traffic is dense.

“We were in and out of hospital most of the time. [The] attacks would occur like twice a week,” Nabweru says.

Her doctors blamed the air in Kampala, which is nine times more polluted than the World Health Organization’s recommended limit, according to a 2022 WHO report. By comparison, Bangladesh, the country with the world’s worst air pollution, is 13 times the recommended limit.

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