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Society

Insurers Vow To Save Your E-Reputation - But At What Price?

A new insurance product promises to protect families against damages to their e-reputation, a new but important concept in this era of fading privacy. But one writer wonders if this isn't all just a scare-mongering way to make new business.

Internet spells danger, warn the insurers (Franco Bouly)
Internet spells danger, warn the insurers (Franco Bouly)

*NEWSBITES

First it was Swiss Life, now AXA has joined the party. Insurers have started selling e-reputation insurance products to protect your family's image on the internet. Called "Protection Famille Intégr@le", AXA's new product will protect you against identity theft, credit-card fraud, harm to your online reputation and e-commerce disputes. Both insurers use a dedicated e-reputation agency called the "Reputation Squad", which will remove all problematic content, while providing psychological support and dealing with legal and administrative issues.

E-reputation has gone from "buzzword" to mainstream in just a few months. AXA and Swiss Life are playing on the anxiety and stress linked to the internet and social networks: the internet is rife with debauchery as well as all kinds of fraud and attacks on your moral - and of course financial - integrity.

Indeed, the internet, that place where hackers, pirates and intellectual property thieves roam freely, is also a place where your family can be attacked. Internet = danger: this is the message that the insurers want to get across to their clients.

In this hostile jungle, parents need to protect their children from the big bad wolves armed with smartphones and Photoshop, who won't bat an eyelid as they publish inappropriate photos of our children. Luckily for them, AXA and Swiss Life, and surely many others to come are here to remind you of the dangers! Even if they're just slightly exaggerated.

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations.

Read the full article in Le Nouvel Observateur in French

Photo - Franco Bouly

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Society

Poland's "Family Values" Obsession Squashes The Rights Of The Individual

Poland's political parties across the spectrum prioritize the family in every area of life, which has a detrimental effect on everything from social services to women. But the state should support a dignified life for every citizen, not just those who in long-term unions.

Photo of an empty stroller in the middle of a crowded square in Warsaw, Poland

In Warsaw, Poland

Piotr Szumlewicz

-OpEd-

WARSAW — Social policy in Poland means family. Both left and right, major parties boast that they support the idea of family, act in the favor of families, and make sure that families are safe.

Everyone seems to have forgotten that, according to Article 32 of the Polish Constitution, "everyone is equal before the law" and "everyone has the right to equal treatment by public authorities."

What's more, "no one shall be discriminated against in political, social or economic life for any reason." In other words, the state should take care of all citizens, regardless of whether they live alone or are part of large families, have childless marriages or informal unions.

Unfortunately, for many years, Polish state policy has been moving in a completely different direction. The subject of government social policy is not the individual, but the traditional family. Even sadder: this policy is also supported by the entire parliamentary opposition. This actually means supporting Christian Democrat social policies that discriminate against women, single people, or those living in informal relationships.

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