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In Australia, Sikhs' Turbans Exempt Them From Bike Helmet Law

Will Catholic nuns and orthodox Jews be next to point to their religious headwear?

BRISBANE TIMES, 612 ABC BRISBANE(Australia), HINDUSTAN TIMES (India)

Worldcrunch

BRISBANE – Does faith protect you in a bicycle accident?

The state of Queensland in northeastern Australia may soon find out...

[rebelmouse-image 27086716 alt="""" original_size="400x296" expand=1]

This guy probably doesn't mind - Photo: Piston Heads

On Tuesday, Australian Transport Minister Scott Emerson announced a change to Queensland's bike helmet laws, as part of a "common sense approach" to accommodate religious beliefs -- in this case, religious headwear.

"But let's be very clear. Just because someone is going to come out there and claim they don't want to wear a helmet for religious reasons, they have to do more than that, they have to demonstrate there is a real, long standing religious belief there," Emerson declared on Australian radio station 612 ABC Brisbane.


Some religions should prove less problematic in the "religious headwear vs. safety headgear" conflict... - Photo: Worldcrunch montage

The law change comes after a practicing Sikh, Jasdeep Atwal, successfully fought the A$100 ($102) fine he received last year for riding a bike without a helmet -- on the grounds that his religion required him to wear a turban that woudn't fit under a helmet, the Brisbane Times reported

More than 70,000 people in Australia practice Sikhism, according to India’s Hindustan Times.

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Geopolitics

The Paradox Of Putin's War: Europe Is Going To Get Bigger, And Move Eastward

The European Union accelerated Ukraine's bid to join the Union. But there are growing signs, it won't stop there.

European Parliament in Strasbourg

Valon Murtezaj

-Analysis-

PARIS — Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine has upended the European order as we know it, and that was even before the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline was cut off earlier this month. While the bloc gets down to grappling with the unfolding energy crisis, the question of consolidating its flanks by speeding up the enlargement process has also come back into focus.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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In a critical meeting on June 23-24, the European Сouncil granted candidate status to Ukraine and Moldova and recognized the “European perspective” of Georgia – a nod acknowledging the country’s future belonged within the European Union.

Less than a month later, Brussels brought to an end the respectively 8- and 17-year-long waits for Albania and North Macedonia by allowing them into the foray of accession negotiations.

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