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Hit It - What's No. 1 On World's Music Charts

Hit It - What's No. 1 On World's Music Charts

Photo:Kris Krüg

Here are some of the songs topping the charts from music hot spots around the world.

Worldcrunch Pick:

The hard rock band Motörhead released their 21st album, Aftershock, last October, 36 years after their 1977 debut album, Motörhead, came to give the British rock "n" roll a raging new life. At the prime age of 67, Lemmy, along with his fellow musicians Phil Campbell and Mikkey Dee, shows that the power trio can still produce the same raw-muscle-car-testosterone-Jack-Daniels-fueled combo that has made Motörhead legend. Here is one of their new tracks:

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Society

"Imperfect" Victims, Hidden Progress: Why MeToo In Italy Is Different

A recent wave of testimony from inside the Italian entertainment industry again failed to gain much attention, another example of MeToo failing to take off in the traditionally sexist country. There are multiple explanations, though also quieter signs that something may be changing.

Photo of two women at a feminist protest in Italy

Two women at a feminist protest in Italy

Ginevra Falciani

For a few fleeting hours, it seemed the MeToo movement might finally break out of the shadows in Italy: the internet was buzzing after the La Repubblica daily had published the testimonies of several actresses recounting the sexual harassment they’d faced.

A week later, on Jan. 16, the associations Amleta and Differenza Donna held a press conference to report that 223 additional testimonies of sexual harassment and violence in show business had arrived since the La Repubblica article.

The activists broke the cases down by gender (in all but two cases the abusers were men, and 93% of the victims were women) and by job title (directors made up 41% of the abusers, followed by actors, producers, teachers, casting directors, agents, critics, and even some audience members). But it was also notable that only 12 actresses had brought their cases to court, and that the names of those accused would not be revealed so as not to compromise ongoing legal actions.

A few newspapers reported the news. Then, nothing more.

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