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From NYC To DC, Yonderman's American Journey Continues

Slovenian-born Andrej Mrevlje has lived all around the world, sharing his stories and ideas. Now, after five years in the Big Apple, it's time for life inside the beltway.

Shadows of power
Shadows of power
Andrej Mrevlje

WASHINGTON — There is always something exciting about leaving your comfort zone and moving on to a new place — into an unknown situation. I never thought that this would happen with such exhilarating a city as New York. And yet, after more than five years of life in "the city that never sleeps," the proposal to move came my way, and I said "yes" immediately. The things I have fallen in love with in New York started to fade away.

I wrote a column on New York a few months after I landed in the city. It was dedicated to Tony Judt, who had passed away a few months before, and whose declared love for New York has become my own love for the city. This in spite of the fact that the New York from the times of Woody Allen and other intellectuals no longer exists. But no matter how much it's been diluted, as Tony Judt wrote from his deathbed, the city still kept its endless charm and liveliness:

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Geopolitics

NATO Entry For Sweden And Finland? Erdogan May Not Be Bluffing

When the two Nordic countries confirmed their intention to join NATO this week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan repeated his plans to block the application. Accusing Sweden and Finland of' "harboring" some of his worst enemies may not allow room for him to climb down.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO

Meike Eijsberg

-Analysis-

LONDON — When Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared his opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO, it took most of the West's top diplomatic experts by surprise — with the focus squarely on how Russia would react to having two new NATO members in the neighborhood. (So far, that's been a surprise too)

But now Western oversight on Turkey's stance has morphed into a belief in some quarters that Erdogan is just bluffing, trying to get concessions from the negotiations over such a key geopolitical issue.

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To be clear, any prospective NATO member requires the consent of all 30 member states and their parliaments. So Erdogan does indeed have a card to play, which is amplified by the sense of urgency: NATO, Sweden and Finland are keen to complete the accession process with the war in Ukraine raging and the prospect of strengthening the military alliance's position around the Baltic Sea.

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