When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

AFP, LE MONDE(France)

Worldcrunch

PARIS - The Chief Rabbi of France was forced to step aside, after a scandal over alleged plagiarism and lying about his education background, reports Le Monde. Gilles Bernheim, 60, announced the decision on Thursday, following an emergency session of the Central Consistory, the main Jewish administering institution in France.

Bernheim, France's highest Jewish religious authority, had previously refused to resign, which he said as a “personal initiative would mean desertion.” Speaking on Tuesday evening on Radio Shalom, a Jewish radio station, he added that: “resigning would be an act of pride, whereas today I must behave humbly.”

After initial vehement denials, Bernheim admitted last week to having plagiarized, "borrowed" in his own words, several authors, for his book Forty Jewish Meditations, published in 2011. He has also acknowledged that he had lied about his agrégation in Philosophy -- a most prestigious but extremely difficult-to-obtain academic status -- from Paris' elite Sorbonne University, after revelations by the French news agency AFP.

[rebelmouse-image 27086627 alt="""" original_size="480x720" expand=1]

Until another chief rabbi is elected, the Grand Rabbi of Paris, Michel Guggenheim and the Director of the Rabbinical School, Olivier Kauffmann will stand in for Bernheim.

France, after the USA and Israel, is home to the third largest Jewish community in the world, with some 500,000 people.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Society

The U.S.-Colombia 'War On Drugs' Has Failed: What Comes Next?

The Biden administration and Colombia's new government seem to agree on the need for a new approach to drugs policy. But will they be able to find support in their countries to forge a new strategy?

Interpol officers accompanying the sister of Colombian drug lord "Otoniel" before her extradition to the U.S.

Luis Carvajal Basto

BOGOTÁ - Some early directives by Colombia's new president Gustavo Petro suggest he sees the 2016 peace accords with the The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) as failed or at best unfinished. Founded in 1964, FARC, the armed wing of the Communist Party, have been fighting the longest-running armed insurgency in the Western hemisphere.

Signed in 2016 under former president Juan Manuel Santos Calderón, the accords were meant to bring peace to the country, yet that peace has been patchy. This is not because another communist guerrilla force in the country, the National Liberation Army (ELN), has refused to join the peace arrangements, nor is it because of the last government's failure to implement the accord.

The problem clearly concerns drug trafficking, which has continued unperturbed since 2016. While drug use remains illegal, drug trafficking, which has long helped FARC fund its insurgency, will always be highly profitable and foment violence. So is it time to decriminalize drug use?

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ