When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LE PARISIEN, LE NOUVEL OBSERVATEUR, LE FIGARO (France)

PARIS - Parisians strolling along the chic Place de l’Alma and the Bastille are running straight into a huge new billboard (3 by 6-meter, or almost 10 by 20-feet) featuring saucy photos of four presidents of France: François Hollande, the current head of state, and predecessors Nicolas Sarkozy, Jacques Chirac and François Mitterrand. Each of their faces has a large lipstick print.

Underneath, the ad says, “What do they have in common?” and declares that the men would have been better off using Ashley Madison, a Canada-based website for discreet adulterous encounters, for their supposedly famous extramarital affairs.

The ad is “totally illegal,” says a lawyer interviewed by French weekly Le Nouvel Observateur, because in France you are not allowed to use anyone’s image without their agreement, except in the case of the public’s right to information.

The ad, according to Le Parisien daily, was turned down “everywhere.” The company did not receive the requisite permission from the city to put up the ads, either, reports Le Figaro, but Noel Biderman, the founder, simply believes the old advertising adage, “There’s no such thing as bad publicity.”

Le Parisien quoted the company’s local spokesman as saying, “I think it will just make them laugh…There’s a culture of infidelity in France.”

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Economy

The Many Paradoxes Of Cuba's Eternal Milk Shortages

Milk shortages are not new in Cuba, where the state pays producers less for their milk of what they can gain by selling it on the black market.

A young girl drinks milk inside her home in Cienfuegos, Cuba

Sadiel Mederos Bermudez

HAVANA — "There is no milk" ceased to be a repeated phrase on the island, because everyone knows it and, probably, by now they have resigned themselves.

Children under seven and the elderly with medical diets don’t receive it with the necessary frequency, even if they are the only sectors of the population with the right to acquire it through a government subsidy.

Because there simply is no milk in Cuba.

The rest of Cubans must buy it in stores in freely convertible currency (MLC). However, powdered or fluid milk hasn't been available in stores in MLC for months. Last time, at the beginning of the year, the price of a bag of 1 to 1.2 kilograms was between 6 and 8 MLC ($6-8).

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ