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Fashion Retailer Mango Apologizes For "Slave Style" Necklace

LE NOUVEL OBSERVATEUR (France), THE GUARDIAN (UK)

Worldcrunch

PARIS - Spanish fashion retailer Mango has issued an official apology for advertizing a necklace on its French website as “slave style,” blaming it on a "translation error."

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Screenshot of the incriminating ad on Mango’s French websitenow removed

French actresses Aïssa Maïga and Sonia Rolland quickly launched an online petition entitled "Slavery Is Not Fashion" to boycott the brand and have the 24.99 euro necklace removed from the collection, French daily Le Nouvel Observateur reports.

In response to the petition, which garnered thousands of signatures, the Spanish fashion retailer removed the controversial label from its website and apologized on its official Twitter account:


@deejaydie94 Nous regrettons cette erreur de traduction. Les services correspondants sontprévenus et effectueront la correction.

— MANGO (@Mango) March 4, 2013

Translation: "We regret the translation error. Relevant services have been alerted and will make the correction"

In Spanish, the word "esclava" can mean both "slave" and "bracelet."

In June 2012, German sports apparel maker Adidas had similarly cancelled plans for a training shoe with a shackle-like ankle cuff after critics said it resembled a symbol of slavery, the Guardian reported.

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