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CBN RADIO (Brazil)

In Jardim Helena, a poor area 18 miles from downtown São Paulo, postmen now need a security escort to deliver mail. Already this year, more than 450 mailmen have been victims of robbery and flash kidnappings, CBN Radio reports. Authorities explain that Jardim Helena's many alleyways make it easy for criminals to prey on the post.

The number of this kind of crime is rising in Brazilian metropolitan areas, according to the Post Office Union. Over 80% of the cases involve postmen driving cars or motorcycles. Robbers attack in groups and mostly look for credit cards sent by banks to costumers. Brazil's post office says it is a common practice to send escorts to dangerous areas, but the number of cars and security personnel are not enough to protect all employees.

A group in charge of similar crimes in Bahia reported to the police that the price for each robbed card ranged from around $25 to $100). To unblock the cards, gangs were in touch with employees of telecom companies who stole private information from customers and faked documents. Purchases were mostly made at electronics shops—sometimes, with a help of staff and even owners.

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And on another continent, parts of the U.S. are legislating to ensure that women can no longer have a legal abortion. In both cases, lurking patriarchal beliefs were allowed to reemerge when political leadership failed. We have an eerie feeling of travelling back through time. But how long has patriarchy dominated our societies?

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