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AMBOSELI TRUST FOR ELEPHANTS (Kenya), AAP (Australia)

Worldcrunch

They say elephants never forget. We humans don't either.

When the Amboseli Trust for Elephants organization in Kenya learned of a baby elephant calf stuck in a 1.5-meter well somewhere on the savannah, there was only one thing to do: Jump in the SUV, hurtle toward the scene and lay it all out there for a happy ending for the worried big momma elephant.

Watch the video to see the organization's worker, Vicki Fishlock, narrate the agonizing moments when two rescue workers try and tie a rope around the slippery elephant calf and pull her out:

So, all is well in the end: the elephant sprints off to rejoin her mother with that Coldplay song playing in the background. Heart-warming knowing that the help of the rescue organization saved the life of a very cute baby elephant.

But this is where the tale turns in how we may see the vulnerable species. Zookeeper Lucy Melo, who played an integral part in rearing the elephant Mr. Shuffles at Sydney's Taronga Zoo.

During a routine animal washing demonstration Friday, the two-year-old elephant pinned Melo against a bollard, sending the zookeeper into cardiac arrest for five minutes. She was rushed to hospital where she remained in a critical condition, reports the Australian Associated Press (AAP).

It remains unclear as to why the elephant was aggressive toward Ms Melo.

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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