When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

XINHUA (China), CHINA DAILY (China), BBC NEWS (UK)

LONDON - Eight women badminton players from Korea, China, and Indonesia were disqualified from the London Olympics for unsporting conduct on Wednesday.

Chinese double players Yu Yang and Wang Xiaoli are accused by the Badminton World Federation of deliberately losing a game on Tuesday to get easier rivals in the playoffs. The other disqualified players are Jung Kyun-Eun, Kim Ha-Na, Ha Jung-Eun and Kim Min-Jung, all of South Korea, and Meiliana Jauhari and Greysia Polii from Indonesia, writes Chinese news agency Xinhua.

"We applaud the federation for having taken swift and decisive action," said IOC communications manager Emmanuelle Moreau. "Such behavior is not compatible with the Olympic values."

Chinese player Yu Yang said after the recent match: "We've already qualified, so why would we waste energy? It's not necessary to go out hard again when the knockout rounds are tomorrow," Xinhua reports.

The Chinese Olympic Federation announced that it had opened an investigation in the matter, reports China Daily.

"The Chinese Olympic Committee is devoted to promote the Olympic spirit, carries forward the sports spirit of equity and justice, and opposes any kind of behaviors to violate the sporting spirit and morality," the spokesman said. He also added that further actions would be taken according to the results of the investigation, reports China Daily.

Here's another perspective on the matter, courtesy of Twitter:

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Missiles And Euphoria: The Folly Of War On Full Display In Kharkiv

As Ukraine's counter-offensive gathers steam, the city of Kharkiv is targeted by Putin's forces. Here's a view from up close, during heavy shelling that has sparked power and water outrages, even as the liberation of territory sets off scenes of joy and elation.

Russian shelling destroyed a residential building in Kharkiv in early September 2022.

Ivanna Skyba-Yakubova

KHARKIV — For several years, a woman has been sitting on the corner of my street selling flowers almost every day. On Sep. 9, our neighborhood was shelled for the first time – and have no doubt that an hour and a half after the missile hit our street, she was sitting right there in her usual place. People were cleaning up broken glass and cutting tree branches 50 meters from her. Some came to buy flowers.

In some way, this is all you need to know about life right now in Kharkiv.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

We are hostages of geography: the time it takes for the missile to reach Kharkiv from Belgorod, Russia, as air defense officers tell us, is 43 seconds. None of our existing defense systems are able to prevent their arrival in our neighborhood.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ