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Dude, Where's My Dreads? South Africa's Odd Spate Of Dreadlock Theft

I've been dreadknapped!? And they didn't even take my wallet.

THE TIMES (South Africa)

Worldcrunch

JOHANNESBURG – Jasper Munsinwa was partying at a nightclub in Johannesburg when he noticed his friend, Mutsa Madonko, was missing. “When we found him, he still had his cellphone and wallet with all his money inside.”

Mutsa was passed out, with all his deadlocks cut off.

According to The Times, Mutsa is one of a growing number of people who have had their dreadlocks stolen these past few months. This new trend is linked to the rising demand for natural dreadlocks as hair extensions, said The Times.

In South Africa, shoulder-length dreadlocks cost between $20 and $80, while longer ones can cost up to $280. It takes years to grow proper dreadlocks – 10 years, in the case of Mutsa Madonko.

Hairstylist Lebo Masimong said women were the most at risk of getting their locks chopped off: "You are an easy target if you walk around the CBD central business district and your hair is loose. They don't care about your money or fancy phone. They are only after your hair."

Photo -Knotty Boy Natural Dreadlock Care

Photo - Dreadlocks

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

And If It Had Been Zelensky? How The War Became Bigger Than Any One Person

Ukraine’s Minister of Internal Affairs Denys Monastyrsky was killed Wednesday in a helicopter crash. The cause is still unknown, but the high-profile victim could just have well been President Zelensky instead. It raises the question of whether there are indispensable figures on either side in a war of this nature?

Photo of ​Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky looking down in a cemetery in Lviv on Jan. 11

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in Lviv on Jan. 11

Anna Akage

-Analysis-

The news came at 8 a.m., local time: a helicopter had crashed in Brovary, near Kyiv, with all the top management of Ukraine's Ministry of Internal Affairs on board, including Interior Minister Denys Monastyrsky. There were no survivors.

Having come just days after a Russian missile killed dozens in a Dnipro apartment, the first thought of most Ukrainians was about the senseless loss of innocent life in this brutal war inflicted on Ukraine. Indeed, it occurred near a kindergarten and at least one of the dozens killed was a small child.

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But there was also another kind of reaction to this tragedy, since the victims this time included the country's top official for domestic security. For Ukrainians (and others) have been wondering — regardless of whether or not the crash was an accident — if instead of Interior Minister Monastyrsky, it had have been President Volodymyr Zelensky in that helicopter. What then?

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