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Transmilenio buses were hailed as state of the art
Transmilenio buses were hailed as state of the art
Alidad Vassigh

BOGOTA – Even if the buses in the Colombian capital ran on time, you'd never know. A Bogotá city councilman recently confirmed that hundreds of clocks on its metro-bus network platforms were no longer working.

Turns out, most stopped working at least five years ago – and counting!

Councilman Hosman Martínez complained that 406 electronic clocks found on platforms of the pioneering Transmilenio bus service — which were apparently scheduled for change in 2009 — were "in a state of utter deterioration," according to El Espectador.

"Some don't count the minutes, some do not show the right hour and others are simply covered in dust," he said. It will cost the equivalent of more than $1,000 to repair each clock. The faulty clocks were part of the first two phases of the Transmilenio network, billed as an innovation transportation system whose bus lines carry just under two million passengers a day.

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Donetsk People's Republic holds referendum on joining Russia

Irene Caselli, Cameron Manley, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

Russia's proxies in Donetsk, Luhansk, Kherson, and Zaporizhzhia regions announced that referendums on joining Russia had begun that Ukrainian and Western officials have denounced as shams.

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For four days, "voting" will be held at people's homes "for security reasons," Russian state-controlled news agency RIA Novosti wrote. On the last day of the "referendums," on September 27, locals will be asked to go to "polling stations."

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