When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Venezuela

Dios Mio, Venezuela's New Sports Minister Is Fencer Famous For Nude Photo

CLARÍN (Argentina)

Worldcrunch

CARACAS – Venezuelan politics continues to attract the world's attention. After the death of Hugo Chavez and the recent election of his no-less outspoken successor, Nicolas Maduro, eyes have now turned to the newly anointed Sports Minister: Alejandra Benítez, the Olympic fencer best known for posing nude just before last year's London Olympic Games.

“It's as if I take my clothes off during each international match,” she told Ultimas Noticias where the photo appeared of her clothes-less with strategically placed arm and helmet, reports Clarín.

Aside from being an accomplished sportswoman, 32-year-old Benítez has a BA in odontology and is a substitute member of Parliament.

Her sports career includes four Olympic Games appearances: Athens 2004, Beijing 2008 and London 2012. She came in 15th place.

Eficiencia o Nada! Hoy se asoma un nuevo reto y lo asumiré con el mismo compromiso de la Atleta que defiende a su Patria cueste lo q cueste!

— Alejandra Benitez R (@BenitezVEN) April 22, 2013

After her nomination as Sports Minister, Benítez wrote on Twitter: “Efficiency or Nothing. Today a new challenge has appeared and I will assume it with the same engagement of an athlete who is defending their nation at whatever cost.”

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Economy

Why More Countries Are Banning Foreigners From Buying Real Estate

Canada has become the most recent country to impose restrictions on non-residents buying real estate, arguing that wealthy investors from other countries are pricing out would-be local homeowners. But is singling out foreigners the best way to face a troubled housing market?

Photo of someone walking by houses in Toronto

A person walks by a row of houses in Toronto

Shaun Lavelle, Riley Sparks, Ginevra Falciani

PARIS — It’s easy to forget that soon after the outbreak of COVID-19, many real estate experts were forecasting that housing prices could face a once-in-generation drop. The logic was that a shrinking pandemic economy would combine with people moving out of cities to push costs down in a lasting way.

Ultimately, in most places, the opposite has happened. Home prices in the U.S., Canada, Britain, Germany, Australia and New Zealand rose between 25% and 50% since the outbreak of COVID-19.

This explosion was driven by a number of factors, including low interest rates, supply chain issues in construction and shortages in available properties caused in part by investors buying up large swathes of housing stock.

Yet some see another culprit deserving of particular attention: foreign buyers.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest