When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LA STAMPA

Da Vinci Gravediggers? Looking For Mona Lisa's Remains

Researchers want to analyze the DNA – and skull -- of the Renaissance woman who most believe sat for Leonardo, to finally verify the true identity of the legendary subject.

(uhuru)
(uhuru)
Maurizio Assalto

FLORENCE - Grave hunters, centuries-old mysteries, and historical records spread out across Europe. Da Vinci's ghosts are there too. This is not a Dan Brown novel, though. In Florence, Italian researchers have undertaken the hunt for the remains of Mona Lisa, the woman who was the model for Leonardo da Vinci's "La Gioconda," the most famous and most analyzed picture of all time. This week, members of Italy's respected National Historical and Cultural Preservation Committee have launched an official project to find the famous lady's grave.

There are many bizarre theories about Mona Lisa's real identity. Some believe she was Isabella d'Este, the Marchesa of Mantua, who had begged the master for a portrait. Others have suggested Isabella Gualanda, who was a favorite of Giuliano de" Medici, co-ruler of Florence with his brother Lorenzo the Magnificent. And then there are those who think she was Leonardo's mother, or even Leonardo himself. According to this theory, he portrayed himself as a woman as a hidden reference to his own homosexuality.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

Ukrainian protestors stand at Brandenburg Gate in Berlin to mark Vyshyvanka Day, an International day to celebrate Ukrainian heritage and traditions

Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou and Bertrand Hauger.

👋 Guten Tag!*

Welcome to Friday, where Russia intensifies shelling in eastern Ukraine, Biden lands in South Korea, and a Mercedes becomes the most expensive car ever sold. Meanwhile, for German daily die Welt, Cosima Lutz explores the sizzling question of the skyrocketing price of cooking oils.

[*German]

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ