CNN (U.S.), REUTERS

Worldcrunch

HAVANA — At the remarkable age of 64, American long-distance swimmer Diana Nyad reached the shores of Key West on Monday afternoon, becoming the first person to swim from Cuba across the Florida Straits without a shark cage.

Congratulations to @DianaNyad. Never give up on your dreams.

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) September 2, 2013

CNN reports that dozens of onlookers — some in kayaks and boats, others wading in the water or standing on shore — cheered her on as she completed her swim in 53 hours.

Reuters recalls that the dangerous Florida Straits had been conquered only once — by Australian Susie Maroney, who used a protective cage at age 22 during a 1997 swim.

#DianaNyad has broken swimmer Penny Palfrey's "12 distance record in #CubaToFlorida Read this @CNN http://t.co/j8kVKVlYb4

— Diana Nyad (@diananyad) September 2, 2013

Check out Nyad's route on her website.

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Society

Germany's Legendary Clubbing Culture Crashes Museum Space

The exhibition “Electro” in Düsseldorf is an unlikely tribute to a joyful and uninhibited club culture, with curators forced to contend with limits of a museum setting ... and another COVID lockdown.

A woman with a "Techno" tattoo in front of the famous Berghain

Boris Pofalla

DÜSSELDORF — The last party at the Berghain nightclub in Berlin lasted from Saturday evening until Monday morning. On the first weekend of December, some clubbers lined up for nine hours outside the former power plant – and still didn’t make it past the doormen. A friend said that dancing in the most famous techno club in the world on its last evening was like landing a spot in the last lifeboat to leave the sinking Titanic on 14 April 1912.

It is surely a coincidence that the first comprehensive exhibition charting the 100-year history of electronic music in Germany opened in the same week that nightclubs across the country were forced to close. It wasn’t planned that way, but it’s like opening an exhibition about the cultural history of alcohol the day after the introduction of prohibition.

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