When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

China

Chinese City Flooded With Abandoned Kids, Shuts Down 'Baby Hatch'

An orphanage in this southeastern city received more abandoned babies in a pilot "safe haven" program than anywhere else in the country.

A baby hatch in Xi'an, China
A baby hatch in Xi'an, China

GUANGZHOU — Because of overwhelming demand, this city in southeast China has suspended its “baby hatch” project that had offered safe places to leave abandoned babies.

Due to the growing number of abandoned babies in the country, Chinese authorities launched the so-called Baby Safety Island pilot projects in 25 cities last year in the hopes of protecting this most vulnerable group of infants’ right to life,Xinhua News reported.

Because of China's inadequate health care system, many poor families choose to abandon their babies who suffer from an "incurable disease or are likely to be permanently disabled for life,” Nanjing's orphanage director Zu Hong told the Modern Express.

Unfortunately within just 45 days of the project, the Social Welfare Home in Guangzhou received an overwhelming 262 babies. The orphanage stated that: “We have exceeded our limit of taking in abandoned babies. We are to stabilise the situation and undertake disease prevention and relocation work for these babies first.” The home did not specify when it will reopen the baby hatch again.

According to Xu Jiuo, the director of the home, the orphanage had received more newborns than any other city in the country that provides the baby hatch arrangement. He also added that thanks to the timely care of these babies, currently their survival rate in Guangzhou has risen to 91%.

Out of the 262 babies, 148 of them are boys and 114 are girls. 67% of the abandoned infants are under one-year-old.

After preliminary examinations these abandoned children were found to all be affected by disorders, the top three of which are cerebral palsy (110), Down's syndrome (39), and congenital heart disease (32).

An official report released in 2010 estimated that there were about 100,000 Chinese infants abandoned each year for various reasons, according to theSound of Hope.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Ideas

A Brief History Of Patriarchy — And How To Topple It

Many people assume the patriarchy has always been there, but how did it really originate? History shows us that there can be another way.

Women protest on International Women's Day in London in 2022

Ruth Mace*

The patriarchy, having been somewhat in retreat in parts of the world, is back in our faces. In Afghanistan, the Taliban once again prowl the streets more concerned with keeping women at home and in strict dress code than with the impending collapse of the country into famine.

And on another continent, parts of the U.S. are legislating to ensure that women can no longer have a legal abortion. In both cases, lurking patriarchal beliefs were allowed to reemerge when political leadership failed. We have an eerie feeling of travelling back through time. But how long has patriarchy dominated our societies?

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ