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Can A Coke-Snorting Comic Villain From Colombia Make A Comeback?


EL TIEMPO
(Colombia)

BOGOTA -Nearly 25 years after being axed by DC Comics, "Snowflame," a cocaine-snorting comic book villain (who also happens to be Colombian), is back – and still ruffling feathers.

DC Comics artists Steve Englehart and Joe Stanton created Snowflame in 1988. "Cocaine is my God – and I am the human instrument of its will," the buzzed baddie declares. Snowflame enjoyed super strength and speed thanks to the large amounts of cocaine he inhaled. According to critics, the character concept glorified drug use -- and was also super xenophobic. DC Comics soon killed the cokehead Colombian off.

Recently, however, an American artist named Julie Sydor decided to rescue the controversial drug-crazed character, giving SnowFlame his own Internet-based comic strip.

In an interview with Colombia's El Tiempo, the artist admitted that the comic plays on the stereotype of the Colombian drug boss. "But my intention isn't to offend Latinos," she said. "I'm hoping Snowflame can transcend the stereotype and become a totally developed and believable character."

Sydor, a graduate of the Minnesota College of Art and Design, has so far drawn up 15 episodes that are "in no way sponsored by DC comics," she explains on her website.

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Geopolitics

Davos, The Slow Melt Into Irrelevance

The Davos Forum was once a true shaper of our collective future in a globalized world. Today it is beyond its expiry date, even if global solutions to global problems are needed more than ever.

photo of snow at Davos with a sign to the Davos Forum

A snowy 2018 edition of the World Economic Forum in Davos

Xu Jinquan/Xinhua via ZUMA
Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — For almost three decades now, perched in the Swiss Alps, has been the sunny face of a globalization that works.

It was the place, in the 1990s, where I understood for the first time the impact of the digital revolution. Davos was a place where one could meet Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk or Yasser Arafat and Shimon Peres, up close, and far away from South Africa or the Middle East.

It was also there that the new democracies of Eastern Europe took their first steps into the free-market economy and where emerging countries could be paired up with international investors.

This era, we must say, is now truly over. The dream-like world of Davos, the world of the free flow of goods and capital, the world of globally integrated supply chains, and technology designed for the common good, has run into perils it did not or could not predict.

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