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CLARIN

Busload Of Fake 'Tourists' Busted With 350 Kilos Of Cocaine

A (regular) bus in Salvador Mazza, Argentina
A (regular) bus in Salvador Mazza, Argentina
Jesús Rodríguez

BUENOS AIRES— A band of 11 suspected cocaine smugglers were caught posing as a festive bus tour group destined for a Buenos Airescarnival, Argentine police reported this week.

The busload of fake "tourists from Ecuador" were stopped near the Bolivia-Argentine border town of Salvador Mazza. After the passengers, 10 men and one woman, said they were going to a carnival in Buenos Aires, police decided to search the bus, and found more than 350 kilograms of cocainehidden inside.

The drugs were packed in bricks, wrapped and sprayed with spices to deter police dogs. Police believe the passengers were hoping World Cup excitement would have relaxed vigilance at the border. "We thought something was not right. A bus with an Ecuador license plate, with ten men and a woman was strange," a policeman told Clarin.

After scanners indicated something unusual under the vehicle's floor, the bus was "literally taken apart" to reveal a hidden level hiding 300 bricks of 1.1 kilograms of cocaine, valued at just under $15.8 million.

"It wasn't so well hidden," said the police officer. The 11 suspects were detained. No carnival, alas, and no World Cup either.

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Future

The Smartwatch May Be The True Killer Device — Good Or Bad?

Connected watches don't just tell the time, they give meaning to life.

Photo of a person wearing a smart watch

Person wearing a smart watch

Sabine Delanglade

PARIS — By calculating the equivalent in muscle mass of the energy that powers gadgets used by humans, engineer Jean-Marc Jancovici, a Mines ParisTech professor and president of the Shift Project, concluded that a typical French person lives as if they had 600 extra workers at their disposal.

People's wrists are adorned with the equivalent power of a supercomputer — all thanks (or not) to Apple, which made the smartwatch a worldwide phenomenon when it launched the Apple Watch in 2014, just as it did with the smartphone with the 2007 launch of the iPhone.

Similar watches existed before 2014, but it was Apple that drove their dazzling success. Traditional watchmakers, who, no matter what they say, didn't really believe in them at first, are now on board. They used to talk about complications and phases of the moon, but now they're talking about operating systems.

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