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Brazilian Joins Famous Ukrainian Topless Protesters To Target World Cup

As Euro 2012 kicks off in Ukraine and Poland under a cloud of controversy, a female protestor in Brazil is already planning for the World Cup in two years -- joining forces with feminist group Femen from Ukraine, which has a unique way of making themselve

Just say 'No' (facebook)
Just say 'No' (facebook)

FOLHA DE S.PAULO/Worldcrunch*

SÃO PAULO - Blond hair, white skin, red lipstick: university student Sara Winter (not her real name) is the first Brazilian member of the Ukrainian protest group Femen. The group is known for the topless protests it organizes around the world to demonstrate against sexism, and to promote women's rights.

"Can I take it off?" she asks the reporter while taking off her shirt in the middle of Paulista Avenue, São Paulo's busiest street. Sara hopes to enroll about 20 young women to help her "attack" the 2014 World Cup Brazilian organizing committee. According to Femen, this kind of international event is a magnet for sex tourism.

Ms. Winter is not a novice when it comes to staging a protest. Last month, she crashed the concert of a Brazilian dancer known for her beautiful body and sexual choreographies. "We are not against the kind of woman that she represents on the stage. We just don't want her to destroy the image of the Brazilian woman". She was intercepted by security, but managed to convince them to let her make a speech after the concert.

Sara hopes to go to the Ukraine in the near future. She has received a donation from Femen of about $1,000 and is now trying to raise some extra money on the Internet. She wants to go there to receive training on protest actions.

*This is a digest item, not a direct translation

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Mariam Nabattu, a religious studies teacher, must work at two schools in central Uganda to make ends meet.

Patricia Lindrio/GPJ Uganda
Edna Namara and Patricia Lindrio

KAMPALA — Allen Asimwe has dedicated more than two decades to teaching geography at a large public high school in southwestern Uganda. Her retirement age, as a public servant entitled to benefits, is just six years away.

She doubts she will wait that long.

“I am determined, I want to quit,” she says, calculating that she could earn more by shifting full time to the salon she opened six years ago to supplement her income. “Given the frustration, I cannot continue in class anymore.”

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