When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

FOLHA DE S. PAULO, O GLOBO (Brazil)

Worldcrunch

RIO DE JANEIRO - Oscar Niemeyer, a Brazilian national icon and one of the most celebrated architects of the 20th century, died on Wednesday in a Rio de Janeiro hospital. He was 104.

Niemeyer rose to international fame as the architect of the main government buildings in the futuristic planned Brazilian capital, Brasilia, inaugurated in 1960, reports O Globo.

He also worked with Swiss-born modernist architect Le Corbusier on the UN building in New York, inaugurated in 1947, and designed the headquarters of the French Communist party in Paris.



The architect also designed the Museum of Contemporary Art of Niteroi in the outskirts Rio de Janeiro, the Oscar Niemeyer in Curitiba as well as Rio de Janeiro"s Sambodromo -- a landmark of Carnival.

He was renowned for his modernist ideas and designed more than 500 buildings around the world. The star architect often said his inspiration came from the hilly landscape and the curvaceous women of his birthplace, Rio de Janeiro.

The “Poet of concrete” as he was nicknamed in his country continued to work on new projects until earlier this year, including the Pelé museum in Brazilian port city of Santos.

Niemeyer graduated in architecture and engineering from the National School of Fine Arts in 1934, before joining the Brazilian Communist Party, reports Folha de S. Paulo.

A memorial service will be held in the presidential palace in Brasilia on Thursday.

Here is our list of Oscar Niemeyer's Ten Greatest Works:

1- Brasilia

Source: Leonelponce

2- The U.N. Headquarters (New York)

Source: Kenlund

3- The Museum of Contemporary Art (Niteroi)

Source: Y.Fuji

4- The Oscar Niemeyer Museum (Curitiba)

Source: Marcelo Pereto

5- French Communist Party Headquarters (Paris)

Source: Francisco J. Gonzalez

6- The Sambodromo (Rio de Janeiro)

Source: Mark Scott Johnson

7- Copan Building (Sao Paulo)

Source: Pablo Trincado


8- St. Francis Church (Belo Horizonte)

Source:Chilangoco

9- Mondadori Palace (Milan)

Source: Luciomon

10- Aviles Cultural Center (Spain)


Source: Februer

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

When Did Putin "Turn" Evil? That's Exactly The Wrong Question

Look back over the past two decades, and you'll see Vladimir Putin has always been the man revealed by the Ukraine invasion, an evil and sinister dictator. The Russian leader just managed to mask it, especially because so many chose to see him as a typically corrupt and greedy strongman who could be bribed or reasoned with.

Putin arrives for a ceremony to accept credentials from 24 foreign ambassadors at the Grand Kremlin Palace on Sept. 20.

Sergiy Gromenko*

-OpEd-

KYIV — The world knows that Vladimir Putin has power, money and mistresses. So why, ask some, wasn't that enough for him? Why did he have to go start another war?

At its heart, this is the wrong question to ask. For Putin, military expansion is not an adrenaline rush to feed into his existing life of luxury. On the contrary, the shedding of blood for the sake of holding power is his modus operandi, while the fruits of greed and corruption like the Putin Palace in Gelendzhik are more like a welcome bonus.

In the last year, we have kept hearing rhetorical questions like “why did Putin start this war at all, didn't he have enough of his own land?” or “he already has Gelendzhik to enjoy, why fight?” This line of thinking has resurfaced after missile strikes on Ukrainian power grids and dams, which was regarded by many as a simple demonstration of terrorism. Such acts are a manifestation of weakness, some ask, so is Putin ready to show himself weak?

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

However, you will not arrive at the correct answer if the questions themselves are asked incorrectly. For decades, analysts in Russia, Ukraine, and the West have been under an illusion about the nature of the Russian president's personal dictatorship.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ