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Argentine Model Suing Yahoo, Google Over Porn And Prostitution Links

The Supreme Court in Argentina is weighing the case brought by María Belén Rodríguez, whose name redirects to X-rated sites in the major search engines.

Argentine Model Suing Yahoo, Google Over Porn And Prostitution Links

BUENOS AIRES — The battle between privacy and freedom of information on the Internet is clearly global.

While Google has just announced that it will comply with a European Union court ruling to give its citizens the right to delete digital information, Argentina's Supreme Court is weighing the arguments of a case brought by model María Belén Rodríguez against search engines Yahoo! and Google for allegedly directing users to porn sites when they type her name.

Lawyers for the Internet companies have argued that search engines should be able to show the contents of websites without incurring legal responsibility.

But María Belén's lawyer Alejandro Arauz Castex said this was causing enormous harm. "You type Belén into the search engine and the first result is María Belén Rodríguez nude, and if you continue, there's a page with pornography. Not philosophy or literature, but pornography," he said.

He added that the action was not seeking the search engines to eliminate the offending contents but to ensure viewers were not led directly to "false links." Google's lawyer asked if Argentine law was contemplating making search engines responsible for "controlling Internet content," and said Google always removed links "whenever illegal content is precisely identified."

The Supreme Court is expected to decide on the case, which was first filed in 2006, in the next several weeks.

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Ideas

A Writer's Advice For How To Read The Words Of Politics

Colombia's reformist president has promised to tackle endemic violence, economic exclusion, pollution and corruption in the country. So what's new with a politician's promises?

Image of Colombian President Gustavo Petro speaking during a press conference in Buenos Aires on Jan 14, 2023

Colombian President Gustavo Petro, speaks during a press conference in the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on January 24, 2023.

Manuel Cortina/ZUMA
Héctor Abad Faciolince

-Essay-

BOGOTÁ — Don't concentrate on his words, I was once advised, but look at what he's doing. I heard the words so long ago I cannot recall who said them. The point is, what's the use of a husband who vows never to beat his wife in January and leaves her with a bruised face in February?

Words are a strange thing, and in literal terms, we must distrust their meaning. As I never hit anyone, I have never declared that I wouldn't. It never occurred to me to say it. Strangely, there is more power and truth in a simple declaration like "I love her" than in the more emphatic "I love her so much." A verbal addition here just shrinks the "sense" of love.

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