CORRIERE DELLA SERA, LA STAMPA (Italy)

Worldcrunch

VENICE - The city famous for its canals and occasional "high water," has withdrawn its candidacy to become European Capital of Culture in 2019 because it is already flooded with tourists, reports Corriere della Sera

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Forrestn

While other cities line up for all the residual payoff of getting such an international designation, Venice Mayor Giorgio Orsoni is not impressed. “It won’t bring us anything. It won’t bring money, just more tourists that the city doesn’t need," he said. "Venice is already a world capital of culture. The European resources are peanuts and the Italian state won’t pay a penny. The industry is struggling to subsidize cultural initiatives that already exist.”

The "lagoon city" sees 20 million tourists each year flocking to take in its romantic waterways and cultural treasures, says La Stampa.

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DanieleDF1995

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Green

Inside Sweden's "100,000-Year" Solution To Bury Nuclear Waste

As experts debate whether nuclear power can become another leading renewable energy source, Sweden has adopted a first-of-its-kind underground depository for nuclear waste — and many countries are following their lead.

At Sweden's Oskarshamn nuclear power plant

Carl-Johan Karlsson

As last fall’s climate summit in Glasgow made it clear that the world is still on route for major planetary disaster, it also brought the question of nuclear power squarely back on the agenda. A growing number of experts and policymakers now argue that nuclear energy deserves many of the same considerations as wind, solar and other leading renewables.

But while staunch opponents to nuclear may be slowly shifting their opinion, and countries like France, the UK and especially China plan to expand their nuclear portfolios, one main question keeps haunting policymakers: how do we store the radioactive waste?

In Sweden, the government claims to have found a solution.

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