Italy

The Costa Concordia Disaster, 10 Years Later — This Happened, January 13

The images of the Italian cruise ship, which had run aground just a few hundred meters from the Tuscany coast, captured the world's attention for a chilly winter week in 2012.

photo of costa concordia capsized

A portion of the capsized cruise ship the day after

Photo - Rvongher/Wikipedia
Anne-Sophie Goninet

Thursday marks 10 years since the Costa Concordia luxury cruise ship deviated from its planned itinerary to get closer to the island Isola del Giglio, before hitting rocks on the seafloor in shallow water and starting to sink. Over the course of six excruciating hours, a rescue effort team worked to evacuate the 4,252 people on board. Sadly, in the end, 33 people died.


“It is a tragedy of unimaginable dimensions, grotesque and frightening,” writes Davide Bartoccini in il Giornale, in an article to mark the disaster’s 10-year anniversary.

A captain abandons his post

The journalist recalls that the ship was so close to the coast that the passengers and crew could have easily swam to safety, but several conditions made it impossible: aboard the Costa Concordia, a giant 56-ton ship, with 13 decks, were many children and elderly passengers, and the accident happened during the night, and during a cold winter .

In the hours that followed, attention shifted to the ship’s captain Francesco Schettino, with questions both about why the ship was so close to land, and why he had abandoned his post before the passengers were evacuated.

He was trying to impress a Moldovan dancer.

Schettino recounted that he'd steered closer to shore to give passengers a good view and to salute others mariners, though it later emerged that he was trying to impress a Moldovan dancer with whom he was having an affair.

Eventually, the captain was found guilty of manslaughter, of causing the wreck and of deserting his post, and sentenced to 16 years in jail. The Costa Concordia was later refloated and towed to Genoa to be dismantled.

Antimo Magnotta, who was working as a pianist on the ship, told the Rome daily La Repubblica that during the night of the disaster, as he was trying his “best to calm down the passengers who were panicking,” he had waited to hear the captain’s instructions. But they “never came.” Magnotta waited five years for compensation, and says he still suffers from insomnia and post-traumatic stress. The pianist released an album three years ago called Inner Landscape, dedicated to the victims of the accident.


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Mariam Nabattu, a religious studies teacher, must work at two schools in central Uganda to make ends meet.

Patricia Lindrio/GPJ Uganda
Edna Namara and Patricia Lindrio

KAMPALA — Allen Asimwe has dedicated more than two decades to teaching geography at a large public high school in southwestern Uganda. Her retirement age, as a public servant entitled to benefits, is just six years away.

She doubts she will wait that long.

“I am determined, I want to quit,” she says, calculating that she could earn more by shifting full time to the salon she opened six years ago to supplement her income. “Given the frustration, I cannot continue in class anymore.”

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