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Coronavirus

Keep Calm And Travel On? Why We Can't Return To Global Shutdowns

The Omicron variant has sparked a new wave of COVID-19 travel restrictions, but the chances of returning to worldwide shutdowns are slim for a series of reasons.

Photo of a passenger walking past a sign indicating the testing center in Heathrow Airport in London.

London's Heathrow airport on Nov. 30

Carl-Johan Karlsson

SOFIA — Two weeks ago, I was swabbing my nose in a minuscule London hotel room, trying to navigate the faulty app that came with my COVID-19 home-test kit. Home ... as in, I need this damn test to be able to fly home.

After re-installing the app and re-reading the instructions, I called the phone number for the support line and got a friendly female voice with a Cockney accent. I asked if they'd had similar glitches in the past. “We get a lot of calls,” she said. “Bit of a pain, innit?


It was indeed. Before booking my ticket to the UK, where vaccinated travelers were still required to get an in-country test within 48 hours of arrival, I’d spent hours checking the green/amber/red traffic light country categorization, filling out the very laborious Passenger Locator Form and comparing prices at the endless list of (mostly fully-booked) NHS-recommended testing clinics.

What I’d forgotten to check, however, was the travel requirement for returning to my home in Bulgaria five days later. Apparently, as I was told by the check-in guy at Heathrow, Bulgaria had red-listed the UK and didn’t accept lateral flow tests, “but you can take a quick PCR at the airport … it’s £119.”

So back I went to London, again researching testing prices — and reading regulations for sleeping in public parks.

Closeup photo of a person take a COVID-19 lateral flow test

"Bulgaria had red-listed the UK and didn’t accept lateral flow tests..."

International Airport Review

The end of closed borders? 

Indeed, as we are reminded by the emergence of the Omicron variant — and the rapid-fire shutdowns of incoming traffic from southern African countries in most of the world — international travel is very much still in a state of, well, flux. Border closings and re-openings, test requirements, cancelled flights: This is the "new normal" of travel. And by that I mean a new kind of complete pain in the ass.

Only days after I finally arrived from London back in my current home of Sofia, the Bulgarian government added another 14 countries to its red-alert list to counter a runaway surge in COVID-19 cases among the European-high 75% of the population that is unvaccinated. That news, of course, has since been drowned out by headlines about the spread of the new variant, with countries around the world imposing travel bans on African nations and instating new public health measures at home.

The hoarding of vaccines helped create their struggle in the first place.

But while flying in the foreseeable future will no doubt be marked by constant alerts of new restrictions, changing government guidelines and updated (and often confusing) screening systems, the question is whether strict border closures is a feasible way forward.

Beyond adding new headaches for those of us who travel abroad for work or visit family, there are the other serious challenges of keeping the global economy running and avoiding that poorer countries continue to be disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

In South Africa, where the Omicron variant was first discovered, officials have lamented that the West’s hoarding of vaccines helped create their struggle in the first place. And now, even while most industry experts expect global air travel to return to normal levels in the coming years, the recovery is unlikely to be evenly distributed between rich and well-vaccinated countries and those lacking the resources to vaccinate and screen efficiently.

The effects of travel, like the virus itself, spread well beyond what we can see with the naked eye.

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Ideas

Peter The Great And Putin The What?

In the context of the war in Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin and his team have repeatedly made references to a glorious figure of Russian history: Peter the Great. But the current would-be tsar's selective memory tells us all we need to know.

Vladimir Putin has always paid tribute to Russian national heroes, like at the Monument to Minin and Pozharsky on Red Square in 2017.

Cameron Manley

-Analysis-

This past Thursday, Russians marked the 350th anniversary of tsar Peter the Great’s birth (June 9, 1672). Celebrations were held in his namesake city, St Petersburg, and the capital Moscow. As part of the celebrations, President Vladimir Putin attended a new exhibition in the capital dubbed "Peter the Great: The Birth of the Empire."

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Of course the exaltation of a leader best known for his Westernization and modernization ambitions is filled with terribly dark irony this year. Indeed, inspired by his time abroad, Peter I built St. Petersburg as Russia’s "window to Europe." Now, instead, Putin's invasion of Ukraine has slammed the door shut on Russia's rapport with the Continent — and indeed threatens to undo whatever progress Russia has made in recent years.

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