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China

"Sheng-nu" No More - Revenge Of China's Unmarried Career Woman

The frequent use of the Chinese term "Sheng-nu," translated as "leftover women," is a sign of the lingering stigma in China of women who don't get married. But financially successful women are turning the tables on the question of social status.

"Sheng-nu" No More - Revenge Of China's Unmarried Career Woman

Some Chinese women are using consumerism to counteract longstanding stigma over their single status

Robert Kozinets and Chih-Ling Liu

In China, if you are female, educated and unmarried by the age of 27, people might use a particular term – "Sheng-nu" – to describe your social status. It translates simply as "leftover women".

The label was deliberately invented to curb the rising number of single women in a traditional society which sometimes views not marrying as a moral transgression. Some even consider it a threat to national security.


Indeed, portrayals of single women as lonely, desperate, overqualified and intimidating appear regularly in Chinese media and news outlets. Research has shown that the "sheng-nu" stigma has pressurized many women into marriage.

Economics as protest

Partly as a result of the expansion of mass education since the economic reform of the 1980s, women in China appear to be increasingly confident about their place in modern society.

The 7 million single women aged 25 to 34 in urban China are among the largest contributors to the country's growth. Women now contribute some 41% to China's GDP, the largest proportion of any country in the world.

And our research reveals that single professional Chinese women are changing how others see them not through protest or activism – but through their economic power. They are using consumerism to counteract longstanding stigma over their single status.

One 33-year-old woman told us:

"During family gatherings, my aunt just loves to tease my parents about why I'm still single. In her mind, I must lead a miserable life. I need to defend my parents [so] I constantly upgrade my own self-image by buying myself more and more expensive clothes to wear."

She continued: "I want the best of everything in life. My sunglasses are from Burberry, my handbag is from Louis Vuitton, my laptop is from Apple ... I show that I'm not miserable and I lead a great life. [My relatives] can then leave my parents alone."

Consumption and economic power have become a way for these women to build legitimacy for an alternative lifestyle

ImagineChina/ZUMA

Gifts for worried parents

And a 30-year-old explained: "The more people want to laugh at you, the more glamorous you need to look in front of them. When you look glamorous, people become more tolerant of you [and your family]."

An IT developer of 35 recalled: "When I bought my mother a golden ring, she was over the moon. My father was very poor when they got married, so she never received a ring from him. I wanted to show both of them that I can afford many, many things."

The marketplace is also capitalizing on the rise of singlehood and its economic muscle. China's "Singles' Day", invented in 2009 by the e-commerce giant Alibaba as a kind of anti-Valentine's celebration for single people, has overtaken Black Friday to become the biggest annual shopping festival in the world.

Singles-day spending

Held on November 11 every year (the date was chosen because of the four number ones in the date 11.11), 2021 has seen record levels of spending.

Japanese beauty company SK-II has also seen a growth in sales after it launched a series of popular videos featuring successful professional women who have chosen not to marry.

Of course, not all single women in China can afford to demonstrate this kind of spending power. But our study suggests that for those who can, a new sense of economic liberty helps to define themselves and their place in Chinese society.

The chance to spend money on themselves – and often on gifts for their parents – helps to positively redefine their single status as something to be proud of.

Through conspicuous consumption, they promote themselves as morally upright, economically independent, successful citizens. The women in our study are deploying the power of the market to counteract the "sheng-nu" stigma and its spread.

Consumption and economic power have become a way for these women to build legitimacy.

As another woman commented: "Single women really should go out more, especially when they are not bound by family life. Go out and see new scenery, experience a new life. You might realize there is another possibility to live."

Despite its rise in contemporary China and Hong Kong, the act of protesting can lead to imprisonment and severe consequences. For stigmatized "sheng-nu" women, direct confrontation in the form of social activism could lead to serious professional or legal consequences.

Instead, consumption and economic power have become a way for these women to build legitimacy for an alternative lifestyle. Their struggle pits the modernizing and global power of the contemporary market against the traditional cultural authority and media power of China's modern party state. And in a surprising turn of events, it looks like the single women are winning.


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Economy

Avon Ladies 2.0: Women Entrepreneurs Revive An Old-School Brand For The Digital Age

The 157-year-old cosmetics firm is banking on the "personal touch" and enterprise of its familiar women sales representatives to see it through the multiple threats of online retailing, changing tastes and global economic tumult.

Photo of a make up artist applying make-up on another woman

"At the end of the day, we're not just a cosmetics business"

Gwendolyn Ledger

SANTIAGO — María Obregón is 41 years old. She is married with three kids and lives in Arica in northern Chile. For 15 years she has been selling Avon beauty products, turning her work into a family business in which she has been joined by her husband and even the youngest of her children.

"We all work together," she says, "and I'm doing very well, thank God." She has excellent customers, she told América Economía speaking from home, and "excellent people around me. It's very hard work. It may not seem so, but it is. I'm so happy to do it. I feel totally fulfilled, organized and so grateful for all the opportunities given to me."

During her time with Avon — one of the world's most iconic beauty brands, founded in New York in the 19th century — Obregón has won herself vacations and other prizes including a brand-new car. She devotes a large part of her day to expanding and cultivating her customer base, promoting products on social media and now, organizing deliveries.

"Avon for me means freedom," she says with unconcealed delight. "It means independence. It means fulfilling myself as a woman, as a person."

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