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Turkey

World Bank Chips In On Turkey's Next Challenge: Gender Parity In The Workplace

With women long shut out of positions of power in Turkish society, the World Bank has created a new program to offer its official stamp of approval for businesses in Turkey that strive for gender parity.

Istanbul (Matthias Rhomberg)
Istanbul (Matthias Rhomberg)

Worldcrunch NEWSBITES

ISTANBUL – Though well on its way to becoming a regional model for democratic capitalism, Turkey still faces questions about human rights and certain outmoded ways of doing business. The glaring lack of gender parity in the workplace is a bit of both.

The World Bank estimates that just one-quarter of eligible Turkish women currently work, and many of those do so off the books. In job interviews, women are often asked questions that are never posed to their male counterparts: "Are you married?" or "Do you have any children?" If answered in the affermative, notes World Bank chief Robert Zoellick, "it can be the reason why women, at times, are not hired."

Zoellick was in Istanbul recently, largely to salute the engine of the Turkish economy. But he also took time to ink an unprecedented accord with Gulden Turktan, head of the Women Entrepreneurs Association of Turkey (KAGIDER). Dubbed the "Model of Equal Opportunity," this new World Bank certificate program is aimed at encouraging companies to aim for sexual equality in the workplace. To start with, 11 Turkish companies have applied to recieve the first stage certificate of the project, which aims to create a 100% equal male-female work environment.

Zoellick said that Turkey has shown serious improvement in the fields of female health and education, including the near complete removal of sexual differentiation in primary schools. But improvements are still needed in the work place. "We don't just see this project as a corporate responsibilty project," said Zoellick. "It is also a project that will increase the wealth of this nation."

Gaining a certificate from the World Bank and KAGIDER will be a boost for the brand-name of the companies, especially those doing business abroad. "We hope that in the near future this program will go beyond the borders of Turkey, and become an example for other countries."

Read the original article in Turkish

Matthias Rhomberg

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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