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CHINA TIMES (Taiwan)

Worldcrunch

SHENZHEN – The secret to economic growth? Unmarried women left free to shop, according to one prominent Chinese economist.

Jin Yanshi, who has since become the target of outrage and contempt from colleagues and others, recently laid out his theory that "cities where there are more leftover and divorced women should enjoy a better economy." Jin, who has served as chief economist at Sinolink Securities in Shanghai, also asserts that "men without any power of consumption should be run out of the city", the China Times reported.

Single women, indelicately referred to as leftover women in China, and divorced women contribute to a more vigorous economy, Jin argues, because "women have two natures: they love money and they love to spend it. Women are innate consuming animals."

Jin based his reasoning on the fact that: "Women express their desire in competition. This competition therefore promotes a city's consumption." He then deduced the conclusion that "Men who do not have any power of consumption won't be able to find wives and won't contribute to the city's economy, and thus should be thrown out of town."

The economist's provocative argument immediately triggered a wave of online criticism in China. One attacked his argument saying, "Jin Yanshi has contempt for women's IQ and incites women to compete with each other. He is misleading them to sacrifice their future happiness to boost consumption."

Ma Guangyuan, another famous Chinese economist, simply judged Mr. Jin's theory to be "a joke."

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Searching For Marianna, A Pregnant Doctor From Mariupol Held Captive By The Russians

We’ve heard about the plight of the soldiers-turned-prisoners from Mariupol. Here are some traces of the disturbing fate of a young female doctor who’s been taken away.

A paper dove reads "Mariupol" at a shelter for displaced children in Uzhhorod, western Ukraine.

Paweł Smoleński

"Wait for me, because I will return…"

Marianna Mamonova wrote these words to her family, among the text messages and short phone calls that are the only remaining fragments used to piece together her recent past. We also have a photo of her, posted on Russian websites, where she looks into the lens, gaunt and exhausted, signed with a number like a concentration camp prisoner.

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Until the Russian-Ukrainian war, Mamonova’s biography was available to anyone who wanted to know. She was born in 1991, studied at the Ternopil Medical University, and later at the Kyiv Military Academy. After completing her studies, she was sent to work in the coastal city of Berdiansk. Her mother says that this is where her daughter's dream came true: She’d always wanted to be a military doctor, and worked in Berdiansk for three years, receiving the rank of officer in the Ukrainian army.

Beginning in 2014, she’d worked stints as a front-line doctor in the Donbas region, and when Russia invaded Ukraine in February she went to war again. This time in Mariupol.

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