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Selling With Shock: What's The Deal With All The Nazi Marketing?

TIMES OF INDIA(India), DIEWELT (Germany), NY TIMES (US), REUTERS (UK), POLSKIE RADIO (Poland)

Worldcrunch

From using Norwegian mass murderers to sell clothes to an unnerving number of examples of Nazi references at Indian stores, shock tactics in marketing seem to be reaching a new low. Here are the worst five recent examples:

1. So business names have to stick in the minds of consumers, right? Puneet Sabhlok in Mumbai went with something everyone could remember: Hitler's Cross. "Hitler is a catchy name. Everyone knows Hitler," Sabhlok told the New York Times.

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2. Apparently, not everyone knows Hitler. Rajesh Shah has been refusing to change the name of his store all week by pleading ignorance: "I had only heard that Hitler was a strict man. It was only recently that we read about Hitler on the Internet," reports the Times of India.

3. Die Welt reported earlier in the year that a new store had sprung up in the German town of Chemnitz. The only problem was that its name bore a worrying resemblance to that of Anders Behring Breivik, who killed 77 people in Norway in July 2011.

4. Back in 2007, shoppers in in an Indian mall were given promotional material adorned with swastikas, urging them to buy new bed linen. Considering the swastika has long been used in Indian religions such as Hinduism, it would not have posed a problem if it wasn't coupled with "Bed and Beyond Presents the NAZI Collection." The furnishings dealer insisted it was merely an abbreviation for New Arrival Zone of India, reports Reuters.

5. The Estonian GasTerm Eesti company was forced to apologize August 27, after it used a photograph of the infamous gate in Auschwitz - "Arbeit Macht Frei" - to promote the company's use of non-toxic gas, reports Polskie Radio.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

A Decisive Spring? How Ukraine Plans To Beat Back Putin's Coming Offensive

The next months will be decisive in the war between Moscow and Kyiv. From the forests of Polesia to Chernihiv and the Black Sea, Ukraine is looking to protect the areas that may soon be the theater of Moscow's announced offensive. Will this be the last Russian Spring?

Photo of three ​Ukrainian soldiers in trenches near Bakhmut, Ukraine

Ukrainian soldiers in trenches near Bakhmut, Ukraine

Anna Akage

Ukrainian forces are digging new fortifications and preparing battle plans along the entire frontline as spring, and a probable new Russian advance, nears.

But this may be the last spring for occupying Russian forces.

"Spring and early summer will be decisive in the war. If the great Russian offensive planned for this time fails, it will be the downfall of Russia and Putin," said Vadym Skibitsky, the deputy head of Ukrainian military intelligence.

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Skinitysky added that Ukraine believes Russia is planning a new offensive in the spring or early summer. The Institute for the Study of War thinks that such an offensive is more likely to come from the occupied territories of Luhansk and Donetsk than from Belarus, as some have feared.

Still, the possibility of an attack by Belarus should not be dismissed entirely — all the more so because, in recent weeks, a flurry of MiG fighter jet activity in Belarusian airspace has prompted a number of air raid alarms throughout Ukraine.

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