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THE NEW YORK TIMES, BBC, REUTERS

Worldcrunch

SEATTLE — Microsoft has announced plans to purchase Nokia’s mobile phone business for $7.2 billion, a move by Microsoft to catch up to competitors Samsung and Apple on the mobile business. Nokia shares jumped by 45% on news of the deal.

According to the BBC, the purchase is set to be completed in early 2014 when about 32,000 Nokia employees will then transfer to Microsoft. Nokia, based in Finland, will also license its patents and mapping services to the American company.

The New York Times reported that former Microsoft executive Stephen Elop, who was running Nokia until the deal was signed, will rejoin Microsoft after the transaction closes. He is regarded as a potential successor for Microsoft CEO Steven A. Ballmer, who plans to retire from the company within a year.

In three years under Elop, Nokia saw its market share collapse and its share price shrivel as investors bet heavily that his strategy would fail, according to Reuters.

Microsoft CEO Steven A. Ballmer, set to retire within a year - Photo: Hayne Palmour IV - U-T San Diego/ZUMA

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Geopolitics

It's Not About Mussolini, Searching For The Real Giorgia Meloni

As the right-wing coalition tops Italian elections, far-right leader of the Brothers of Italy, Giorgia Meloni, is set to become Italy's next prime minister. Both her autobiography and the just concluded campaign help fill in the holes in someone whose roots are in Italy's post-fascist political parties.

Giorgia Meloni at a political rally in Palermo on Sept. 20.

Alessandro Calvi

-Analysis-

ROME — After Sunday’s national election results, Italy is set to have its first ever woman prime minister. But Giorgia Meloni has been drawing extra attention both inside and outside of the country because of her ideology, not her gender.

Her far-right pedigree in a country that invented fascism a century ago has had commentators rummaging through the past of Meloni and her colleagues in the Brothers of Italy party in search of references to Benito Mussolini.

But even as her victory speech spoke of uniting the country, it is far more useful to listen to what she herself has said since entering politics to understand the vision the 45-year-old lifelong politician has for Italy’s future.

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