A smuggling tunnel in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip
A smuggling tunnel in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip
Daniel Rubinstein

TEL AVIV While we talk about a certain economic stability in Ramallah, the economy in Gaza is in free fall, which is due in no small measure to the massive closing of the tunnels used to smuggle in products across the border from Egypt.

The Palestinian economy, at least in the West Bank, is not influenced by events in neighboring Arab countries. In Ramallah, we have even recently begun to talk about bona fide economic stability.

Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah has good reason to believe that his government will be able to pay its workers before the end of the year.

This comes after two years when a much talked-about crisis in the Ramallah government raised fears that the Authority wouldn't be able to pay its salaries. Meanwhile in Gaza, people were talking about the economic situation as something of a boom — thanks to the partial removal of the Israeli blockade, $500 million given by Qatar for development, and the expansion of the smuggling tunnels.

But now, the situation has been reversed, and the Gaza economy is in free fall. This is primarily because of the new Egyptian government’s closing of the smuggling tunnels, which have accounted in the past for up to 50% of imported goods in Gaza. If three years ago there were hundreds of tunnels (some even have estimated as many as 1,200) actively being used at the Rafah border, now there are only 30 in operation.

Egypt closed all the other tunnels in June after realizing most of the terror attacks in the Sinai Peninsula came from Gaza through these tunnels. On Aug. 23, the Egyptian Army halted all the movements in tunnels. One of the most immediate results is a massive gas shortage in Gaza, which has produced long lines at gas stations throughout the region.

A tunnels economy

The Gazan people rely mostly on salaries from the government in Ramallah, the Hamas authorities and international aid. Although these salaries have always been proportionally very low, the purchasing power was stronger when cheaper merchandise was coming in from Egypt.

The most obvious example is gas. In Egypt, thanks to government subsidies, gasoline is sold at just $0.28 per liter. When it was smuggled into Gaza, it could be sold at four times that price, after Hamas taxes were added. The case is the same for many other goods like food and raw materials for industry and agriculture.

There is little doubt that without the tunnels, Gaza’s economy could implode. The Palestinian economics commentator Adel Samara wrote last week in the Palestinian Independece Party newspaper that even if the Kerem Shalom crossing with Israel operates at full capacity, it won't be enough.

According to Samara, what officially comes through this crossing from Israel represents only 30% of what Gazans need. Samara and many other Palestinians challenge the Egyptians: If there is a security factor to the closing of the tunnels, you can open an official commercial crossing. It might be contrary to your treaties with Israel, but it is in your own interest too.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

The New Iraq, Signs Of Hope Amid The Rubble And Reconstruction

How do you rebuild a country decimated by four decades of war and embargoes? Following the withdrawal of the U.S. military, Iraq faces many challenges, from oil revenues captured by the militias and endemic corruption to religious segregation. However, there are glimmers of hope for the country's future.

Street scene in Erbil, Iraq

Théophile Simon

BAGHDAD — With a vast office located at the top of a tower fiercely guarded by the army and a bell to call the staff, Khalid Hamza Abbas is obviously a powerful character, decked out in an impeccable suit. Abbas runs the Basra Oil Company (BOC), the national company responsible for the exploitation of the oil fields in the province of Basra, in the very south of Iraq, from which four million barrels of crude oil flow daily. It’s the equivalent of 4% of world demand and 65% of central government revenue concentrated in a region of only four million inhabitants.

As he explains the profit-sharing scheme between the world’s major oil companies and his public enterprise, the 50-year-old with thin glasses is suddenly stopped dead in his tracks by the ringing of his telephone. He tries a joke to mask his suddenly worried face: "I'm going to ask you to leave my office for a few moments. If I haven't called you back in 10 minutes, call the police."

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ