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Cuba

Cuba MBA's: As Communism Lingers, A New Backdoor To Capitalism Opens

A Spanish university and Catholic clergy in Cuba have joined forces to help train Cuba's business leaders of the future -- even if 'What Future?' remains a looming question as regulations still restrict free enterprise from bloo

Downtown Havana, Cuba
Downtown Havana, Cuba
Daniela Arce

HAVANA – Even before Cuba began cracking its doors open to capitalism, Paulino Garcia always displayed an entrepreneurial spirit. He spent two years at a university in the Soviet Union before returning to his native Cuba to continue his law studies at the University of Havana. After working for a firm called Climex, Garcia eventually managed to open his own restaurant in 1996, thanks to a new law introduced that allowed people to work for themselves.

"I built it from nothing, and with a lot of sacrifice," Garcia says. "I really wanted to have my own restaurant."

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Draghi, Scholz and Macron on their train to Ukraine

June 18-19

  • Rethinking Europe
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