When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Russia

This Happened—December 31: The Path Is Cleared For Putin

After a referendum held in March 1991, the creation of the post of president of Russia was created. Boris Yeltsin was elected Russia's first president in an election of that kind. On this day in 1999, he resigned and was succeeded by Vladimir Putin.

Sign up to receive This Happened straight to your inbox each day!

Why did Boris Yeltsin resign from office?

Within a few years of his presidency, many of Yeltsin's initial supporters started to criticize his leadership, which had caused a downturn in Russia’s economy, affecting not only the country itself, but the entire world. Tensions with the Russian parliament began in 1993, when Yeltsin ordered the unconstitutional dissolution of the parliament. The parliament then attempted to impeach Yeltsin but was unsuccessful.

Who took over for Boris Yeltsin?

During his second term, the government defaulted on its debt and the ruble collapsed in the 1998 Russian financial crisis. In December 1999, Yelstin announced his resignation and his chosen successor: Vladimir Putin took power.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

The Only Path To Peace With Russia? A New Iron Curtain On Ukraine's Eastern Border

With a decisive deal with Putin out of the question, the only way to create a lasting peace is to recreate some fundamental dynamics of the Cold War.

Image of president Joe Biden walking with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in the streets of Kyiv, Ukraine.

President Joe Biden walking with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky down the Walk of the Brave on Constitution Square in Kyiv, Ukraine.

Klaus Geiger

-Analysis-

BERLIN — Volodymyr Zelensky was allowed three minutes, but he spoke for 20. In his speech at the G20 summit in November last year, the Ukrainian president laid out, in greater detail than ever before, how peace with Russia can be achieved – and maintained.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

His main point: “Ukraine is not a member of any of the alliances. And Russia was able to start this war precisely because Ukraine remained in the grey zone – between the Euro-Atlantic world and Russian imperialism. Now, we do not have any security assurances either ... We need effective security assurances.”

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz echoed these words in parliament recently. “At the G20 summit, President Zelensky set out his suggestions for how to achieve a lasting, fair peace,” Scholz said. “We will help Ukraine to achieve such a peace. That is why we are talking to Kyiv and other partners about future security assurances for Ukraine.”

Scholz did not specify precisely what kind of “security assurances” he meant. But Zelensky was very specific in his G20 speech.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest