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Russia

This Happened—December 31: The Path Is Cleared For Putin

After a referendum held in March 1991, the creation of the post of president of Russia was created. Boris Yeltsin was elected Russia's first president in an election of that kind. On this day in 1999, he resigned and was succeeded by Vladimir Putin.

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Why did Boris Yeltsin resign from office?

Within a few years of his presidency, many of Yeltsin's initial supporters started to criticize his leadership, which had caused a downturn in Russia’s economy, affecting not only the country itself, but the entire world. Tensions with the Russian parliament began in 1993, when Yeltsin ordered the unconstitutional dissolution of the parliament. The parliament then attempted to impeach Yeltsin but was unsuccessful.

Who took over for Boris Yeltsin?

During his second term, the government defaulted on its debt and the ruble collapsed in the 1998 Russian financial crisis. In December 1999, Yelstin announced his resignation and his chosen successor: Vladimir Putin took power.

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LGBTQ Plus

Mayan And Out! Living Proudly As An Indigenous Gay Man

Being gay and indigenous can mean facing double discrimination, including from within the communities they belong to. But LGBTQ+ indigenous people in Guatemala are liberating their sexuality and reclaiming their cultural heritage.

Photo of the March of Dignity in Guatemala

The March of Dignity in Guatemala

Teresa Son and Emma Gómez

CANTEL — Enrique Salanic and Arcadio Salanic are two K'iché Mayan gay men from this western Guatemalan city

Fire is a powerful symbol for them. Associated with the sons and daughters of Tohil, the god who bestows fire in Mayan culture, it becomes the mirror and the passage that allows them to see and express their sexuality. It is a portal that connects people with their grandmothers and grandfathers, the cosmos and the energies that the earth transmits.

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