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People's Daily, Sept. 23, 2015

"Xi Jinping begins U.S. visit" reads the front page of Chinese state-run People's DailyWednesday, together with a picture Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife Peng Liyuan waving upon their arrival in Seattle on Tuesday.

The Chinese president's seven-day visit, aimed at strengthening diplomatic and commercial ties with the U.S., comes amid bad news for the Chinese economy, with the manufacturing index falling to a six-year-low this week.

In a speech Tuesday night at a dinner with U.S. business leaders, Xi strove to reassure China's commercial partners, as he pledged to push ahead with economic reforms without resorting to competitive currency devaluation.

He also vowed to work with the United States in the fight against cybercrime, insisting that the Chinese government would never "engage in commercial theft or encourage or support such attempts by anyone," CNN reports.

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Society

A Closer Look At "The French Roe" And The State Of Abortion Rights In France

In 1972, Marie-Claire Chevalier's trial paved the way for the legalization of abortion in France, much like Roe v. Wade did in the U.S. soon after. But as the Supreme Court overturned this landmark decision on the other side of the Atlantic, where do abortion rights now stand in France?

Lawyer Gisèle Halimi accompanies Marie-Claire Chevalier at the Bobigny trial in 1972.

Lila Paulou

PARIS — When Marie-Claire Chevalier died in January, French newspapers described her role in the struggle for abortion rights as an important part of what’s become the rather distant past. Yet since the recent overturning of Roe v. Wade in the United States, Chevalier’s story has returned to the present tense.

A high school student in 1971, Chevalier was raped by a classmate, and faced an unwanted pregnancy. With the help of her mother and three other women, the 16-year-old obtained an abortion, which was illegal in France. With all five women facing arrest, Marie-Claire’s mother Michèle decided to contact French-Tunisian lawyer Gisèle Halimi who had defended an Algerian activist raped and tortured by French soldiers in a high-profile case.

Marie-Claire bravely agreed to turn her trial into a platform for all women prosecuted for seeking an abortion. Major social figures testified on her behalf, from feminist activist Simone de Beauvoir to acclaimed poet Aimé Césaire. The prominent Catholic doctor Paul Milliez, said, “I do not see why us, Catholics, should impose our moral to all French people.”

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