When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

While Monkeys Roam Free In India, Humans Live In Cages

PACHMARHI — Anil Yadav has lived in the hilltop town of Pachmarhi for the past 16 years, but over the past three he says that the monkey population has expanded beyond control. So much so that humans are now being forced to live in cages.

In India, monkeys are sacred and worshipped by Hindus as they are seen as the living representatives of the cherished god Hanuman. Hindu tradition also calls for feeding monkeys on Tuesdays and Saturdays. But now, people are starting to see them as pests.

"If the doors of the house are open they steal all kinds of food from inside," Yadav told Portal KBR. "They jump on the roof and damage it. They steal clothes and rip out wiring. We cannot grow things like flowers because they come and eat them — they’re really wreaking havoc everywhere!"

Even in Delhi, the capital, the monkey population has grown so large and aggressive that overwhelmed city officials have petitioned India’s Supreme Court to relieve them from monkey control duties.

Back in Pachmarhi, the solution is cages — though for the humans, not the monkeys. People have added wire grills to windows and doors to their homes to prevent these anthropoids intruding. "Though, even with the cages you still need to be on the look out," adds Yadav’s friend Kaushal.

He recalls one time when he was taking a bath and saw a dozen monkeys trying to take his clothes and cell phone. "I had to jump out to chase them away!"

Local forest officials say they are have been flooded with complaints, though rangers say that local residents are part of the problem — leaving food out in the open and throwing scraps on the ground.

Photo: Capitan Giona

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Migrant Lives

Across Africa, Families Of Migrants Lost At Sea Join Forces For Comfort And Justice

In West and North Africa, survivors of migrants who've vanished have come together to support each other and pay tribute to their family members. But above all, they're trying any means possible to find out the truth and and get justice after years of silence.

Tunisian migrants travel through the Mediterranean Sea in a small fishing boat towards the island of Lampedusa

Haïfa Mzalouat

ZARZIS — “I need to know the truth! Where is my son?”

Souad’s voice resonates strongly through the square in the town of Zarzis, in the south of Tunisia. On Sept. 6, 2022, in spite of the sweltering heat, the families of people who went missing during migration marched through the town with sympathetic activists, holding banners and slogans.

This date was chosen in homage to the 80 people who went missing after a small boat departing from Tunisia sank off the coast of Italy. Ten years later, the mother of one of the lost at sea is still there, waiting for answers.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ